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Internet and email policy in the workplace

Most companies have a log-on agreement stating that e-mail is to be used for business purposes only. What about personal e-mails to your husband or funny e-mails that you forward to your friends? Are you afforded an expectation of privacy when you use it for these personal purposes and violate company policy? To what extent should the company go?

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Most companies have a log-on agreement stating that e-mail is to be used for business purposes only.
What about personal e-mails to your husband or funny e-mails that you forward to your friends?
Every company presents a code of ethics when it comes to the use of their intranet, internet and other technologies. Many employees take advantage of the fact they are not being directly overseen by a supervisor, so they spend free time (of what they think is free time) surfing the net, sending out instant messages, playing games or replying to email. This is abuse of company IT, it typically called cyber-loafing. As a result of cyber-loafing, companies lose on productivity, efficiency and money (Webopedia, 2013).
Companies also produce these codes of ethics to help prevent cyber-loafing, but it help to protect themselves and their employee's from lawsuits. Employee's that send out sexual or racial or other explicit emails can be offending as well as unprofessional. If an employee sends a joke or link that is sexual in nature, most companies view this as sexual harassment and take it very serious. This is an area that can set the company or employee up for a sexual harassment lawsuit. In most states, and some countries, this is also considered as cyber ...

Solution Summary

The solution examines the ethical issues concerning private use of internet and email in the workplace.

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