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Stearidonic Acid (SDA) in Soy plants

1)

The biochemical pathway by which SDA is produced in the modified soya plants is shown in the diagram attached. The fatty acids and transformation shown in black occur naturally in unmodified soya, whilst those shown in red are those which occur as a result of the modification process. In the case of genetic modification to confer insect resistance a single Bt gene is inserted into the genome. Explain why a biotech company needed to insert two genes into the soyabean genome so that the modified plant would produce Stearidonic acid (SDA). HIGHLIGHT THE ESSENTIAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE TWO PROCEDURES.

2)
In order to insert the two foreign genes required they would first have to be isolated from cells of the fungus and primrose - like plant. Describe in general terms the process by which a sequence of DNA coding for a particular protein can be isolated from eukaryotic cells actively producing that protein. YOU DO NOT NEED TO EXPLAIN HOW YOU OBTAINED THESE CELLS.

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The above diagram shows the biochemical pathway by which SDA is produced in the modified soya plants. The fatty acids and transformation shown in the black occur naturally in unmodified soya, whilst those shown in red are those which occur as a result of the modification process.

1) The single Bt gene that is often inserted in a plant genome encodes for a single protein that is toxic to a target insect pest. The gene by itself is sufficient for the production of the protein. In the case of SDA synthesis, the diagram illustrates that this is a two step process. First oleic acid and linoleic acid are used to make alpha-linolenic acid and the cell will need one ...

Solution Summary

The solution answers questions regarding SDA in soy plants and plant modification.

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