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Voice Stress Analysis

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Please help summarize the science behind voice stress analysis biometrics (i.e., how it works) and how it can be used in criminal investigations.
Identify at least 2 challenges of voice stress analysis. In other words, what are the limitations of its use?
Provide a hypothetical example of this biometric being used in a criminal investigation.
Be sure to support your answers with properly cited research and examples of the biometrics applied in the public and private sector.

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http://www.forensicmag.com/articles/2010/10/solving-cases-technology-voice-stress-analysis

http://www.policeone.com/investigations/articles/48102-Police-Using-Voice-Stress-Analysis-to-Detect-Lies/

Assistance with summarizing the science behind voice Stress Analysis biometrics (i.e., how it works) and how it can be used in criminal investigations.

In reference to the science behind VSA, there is actually no valid scientific evidence to validate the claims made by supporters that VSA can detect lying. Nevertheless, the way that the technology operates under the premise that a person's voice emits detectable fluctuation, which is present in two separate forms of modulation including both ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses voice stress analysis and its effectiveness in criminal investigations.

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General Statistics Null Hypothesis

1 What is the difference between a null hypothesis and an alternative hypothesis? Is the null hypothesis always the same as the verbal claim or assertion that led to the test?
Why or why not?

2 For each of the following pairs of null and alternative hypotheses, determine whether the pair would be appropriate for a hypothesis test. If a pair is deemed inappropriate, explain why.

a. H0: u > or = 10, H1: u < 10

b. H0: u = 30, H1: u not equal to 30

c. H0: u > 90, H1: u < or = 90

d. H0: u < or = 75, H1: u < or = 85

e. H0: x > or = 15, H1: x < 15

f. H0: x = 58, H1: x not equal to 58

3 For each of the following pairs of null and alternative hypotheses, determine whether the pair would be appropriate for a hypothesis test. If a pair is deemed inappropriate, explain why.

a. H0: pie > or = 0.30, H1: pie < 0.35

b. H0: pie = 0.72, H1: pie is not equal to 0.72

c. H0: Pie < or = 0.25, H1: pie > 0.25

d. H0: pie > or = 0.48, H1: pie > 0.48

e. H0: pie < or = 0.70, H1: pie > 0.70

f. H0: p > or = 0.65, H1: p < 0.65

4 On CNN and other news networks, guests often express their opinions in rather strong, persuasive, and sometimes frightening terms. For example, a scientist who strongly believes that global warming is taking place will warn us of the dire consequences (such as rising sea levels, coastal flooding, and global climate change) she foresees if we do not take her arguments seriously. If the
scientist is correct, and the world does not take her seriously, would this be a Type I error or a Type II error?
Briefly explain your reasoning.

5 Many law enforcement agencies use voice-stress analysis to help determine whether persons under interrogation are lying. If the sound frequency of a person's voice changes when asked a question, the presumption is that the person is being untruthful. For this situation, state the null and alternative hypotheses in verbal terms, then identify what would constitute a Type I error and a
Type II error in this situation.

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