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Free Energy Change and Standard Free Energy Change

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What is the difference between the free energy change (delta-G) for a reaction and the standard free energy change (delta-G°') for the reaction?

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Free Energy Change and Standard Free Energy Change

Question

What is the difference between the free energy change for a reaction and the standard free energy change for the reaction?

Explanation

By definition, for all spontaneous reactions, the free energy change of the reacting system must be negative. In other words, the overall free energy of the system decreases. This is an absolute and never changes.

A reaction can occur spontaneously only if delta-G is negative. The flip side of this statement is this: a reaction cannot occur spontaneously if delta-G is ...

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Calculating the Equilibrium Constant: Change in Free Energy

Survey of physical chemistry

State all of the assumptions (e.g. ideal gas etc).

(previous reaction is 2H??2(g) + O2(g) ----> 2H2O(g))

Given the reaction in the previous question at 298 Kelvin where H2 has a partial pressure of 0.10 bar, O2 is at 0.20 bar, and H2o is at 1.5 bar:
(a) Determine the direction and quantify the change in free energy the reaction must undergo to reach equilibrium.

(b) Calculate the equilibrium constant.

(c) Illustrate the reaction on a plot of Free Energy versus % Reactants/Products (show ?GO, the approximate position of Q for the given partial pressures, and the position of Q at equilibrium).

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