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Child abuse and the role of a case manager

This job delineates duties and training of a case manager. Resources are added to explain the topic.

Solution Preview

The following articles have either been abstracted and included in the response directly or attached as full-text files due to their size. These should provide you with the information that you need to answer your question about the special needs of abused children and the kinds of specialized training or access to resources needed by case managers.

While children who have been abused or who have witnessed abuse may share needs and services, it is important to remember that each child's experience and needs are unique. Services commonly accessed in instances of child abuse include a range of psychological, health/hygene, safety and other specialized services. It is also important to recognize that paramount to any other need is that of a safe environment where the child can regain a sense of stability.

References:

1. Hollows, Anne and Armstrong, Helen. "Current Developments in Training." Child Abuse Review; Aug 1992, Vol. 1 Issue 2, p136-137, 2p.
Abstract:
This section presets news briefs about training related to child abuse social work. The Child Abuse Training Unit (CATU) is hoping to undertake work shortly to upgrade the successful Child Protection pack on implementing the Children Act. A recent survey of pack users gas a response of over 60% and covered more than 6500 people who had been trained with the pack to date. According to the survey, the pack was successful in meetings its aims, but trainers clearly wanted a legal update on the case law emerging from the Children Act. ...

Solution Summary

References are added to show how child abuse can be affected by the role of a case manager. Functions of case managers are also explained.

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