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Jesus as seen in the Old Testament

1. Describe the significance of the genealogy of Jesus as recorded in Matthew's
Gospel.

2. What does Jesus teach about in His Olivet Discourse and what does He state concerning His return in His Second Advent? (Matthew 24-25)

3. What is the Great Commission Jesus charged His disciples to carry out after His ascension? (Matthew 28:16-20)

4. Explain the meaning of the phrase "God with us" as mentioned in Matthew 1:18-25.

5. Explain how Jesus used the Old Testament in His ministry.

6. What was the first miracle Jesus performed and where was it done? What impact did the miracle have on His disciples? (Matthew 16:13-20)

7. What three illustrations does Jesus use in His parables of lostness? What is the reaction when the lost are found? What do these parables tell us about God's perspective of the lost? (Luke 15)

8. Identify four Old Testament prophecies about Jesus and indicate how Jesus fulfilled them.

Solution Preview

You have basically up to 12 questions and each of them constitutes a vast topic. Here I will give you detailed points on which you will base your own study. You will need to go back to those chapters and verses, read and digest them for every detail to be clear and smooth. Take care and all the best in your studies. Here we go.
1. Describe the significance of the genealogy of Jesus as recorded in Matthew's
Gospel.
Only two of the Four Gospels narrate the genealogy of Jesus. Luke's Gospel, having a more universal scope, traces Jesus' genealogy down to Adam. On the contrary, Mathew's Gospel traces Jesus' genealogy down to Abraham i.e. the arch Patriarch of the Jews. The significance is to show that Jesus is connected to and grounded on the leading and outstanding pillars of the messianic promises. Presenting him as the Messiah and not proving how that can be true would have been void. In fact, in the first verse, where Abraham and David occupy prominent positions, the evangelist states very well that Jesus Christ is the Son of David and the Son of Abraham. The meaning and significance of his name (Jesus) and title (Christ) could be understood through the genealogy.
In Genesis 12:2-3, God promises to make Abraham a great nation, to bless him to the extent that he will turn into a blessing for all the clans on earth. In Genesis 22:18, God states that all nations on earth will bless themselves by his descendant. Now in the book of Acts of the Apostles 3:26 we read that God raised Jesus from the dead so that he will bless everyone. He is presented as the one that fulfills the promises made to Abraham. Moreover, the mentioning of four Old Testament women in the genealogy helps to understand that: Tamar, Rahab, Ruth and Bathsebea. The first three were foreign women and last was not married to an Israelite and their marital union was irregular (Gen 38; Josh 2; Ruth 3; 2 Sam 11) yet they were all instruments of God in continuing the messianic line. Furthermore, their being included in the important Israelite history and the history of salvation shows that even the non-Jews have a place in the salvation operated by Jesus (meaning Savior). According to Brown (), it is the combination of the scandalous or irregular union and of divine intervention through the woman that explains best Matthews choice in the genealogy. Mary's pregnancy was considered a scandal, yet the child was begotten through the Holy Spirit. God intervened to bring to fulfillment the messianic heritage (cf. R.E. Brown, The Birth of the Messiah. Garden City: Doubleday, 1977; R.E. Brown, An Introduction to the New Testament. New York: Doubleday, 1997).
Coming to being connected to David, the idea portrays Jesus as the kingly son of David the long awaited Messiah. In 2 Samuel 7 God promises David a son, a sovereignty that will ever stand firm and a throne that will be forever secure (consult also 1 Chronicles17). Messiah means anointed and kings are normally anointed, therefore Jesus being presented as the Messiah (Matthew 1:17) alludes to him being the anointed son of David, the fulfillment of the prophecy of 2 Sam 7 (Luke explains that better). Some scholars maintain that the number fourteen has a significant meaning for the author; I think that whatever could be said will only be a conjecture and will have little or no meaning.
2. What does Jesus teach about in His Olivet Discourse and what does He state concerning His return in His Second Advent? (Matthew 24-25)
One issue elaborated in Matthew's composition of this discourse is to deal with the fact ...

Solution Summary

Only two of the Four Gospels narrate the genealogy of Jesus. Luke's Gospel, having a more universal scope, traces Jesus' genealogy down to Adam. On the other hand, Mathew's Gospel traces Jesus' genealogy down to Abraham i.e. the arch Patriarch of the Jews. The significance is to show that Jesus is connected to and grounded on the leading and outstanding pillars of the messianic promises. Presenting him as the Messiah and not proving how that can be true would have been void.
At the region of Caesarea Philippi, Jesus put a question to His disciples: "Who do people say the Son of Man is?" After reporting what other say, Jesus asked them: "Who do you say I am?". At this point Peter made his confession (Matthew 16:13-20). Matthew attributes innovative significance to Peter's confession. He presents it as a fundamental revelation of who Jesus is. A revelation which did not come through human intervention but through God's, who enabled Peter to recognize Jesus as "the Messiah, the Son of the living God." The evangelists used Old Testament quotations to support their arguments.

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