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Adult developmental stage of humanistic theory

Can you explain the developmental stage of the humanistic theory of Maslow and Rogers as it relates to adulthood or being an adult? (at least 250 words).

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Let's take a closer look. I also provided an excerpt at the end of this repsonse, which expands on Roger's stages of development. I also attached an article, which explains some of Roger's ideas and concepts more fully.

RESPONSE:

1. Can you explain the developmental stage of the humanistic theory of Maslow and Rogers as it relates to adulthood or being an adult?

Maslow does not formulate a full developmental stage theory as it relates specifically to nay age group, but a more general stage of needs that need to be met in progression, in order to self-actualize, which is mostly an adult trait. In Adulthood, like in childhood or other developmental stages, we need to satisfy the basic needs and progress to the next stage or need before we move on to the next level of human need.

Therefore, in this respect, if an adult has her or his human needs met (physical, safety, belonging/love, and esteem needs), they can move to self-actualization, as described by Maslow, although few people are believed to meet the stage.
Physically, the adult would need her physical needs taken care of, thirst, hunger, etc. For example, is an adult lacks vitamin C, it will lead to a very specific hunger for things which have in the past provided that vitamin C, i.e. orange juice. An adult meet her thirst needs first, then hunger, but if someone was choking the person, then air is the most important.
When the physiological needs are largely taken care of, the second layer of needs comes into play (safety needs) where the adult will become increasingly interested in finding safe circumstances, stability, protection, developing a need for structure, for order, some limits. Or, it might present as buying a "home in a safe neighborhood, a little job security and a nest egg, a good retirement plan and a bit of insurance, and so on." (http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/maslow.html).

Next, the third level of love and belonging needs arrives. The adult will begin to feel the need for friends, a sweetheart, children; affectionate relationships in general, even a sense of community. In contract, some people become increasing susceptible to loneliness and social anxieties. The adult will show these needs through such things as a "desire to marry, have a family, be a part of a community, a member of a church, a brother in the fraternity, a part of a gang or a bowling club. It is also a part of what we look for in a career." (http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/maslow.html)

When the adult feels loved and a sense of belongingness, she or will begin to seek self-esteem. "Maslow noted two versions of esteem needs, a lower one and a higher one. The lower one is the need for the respect of others, the need for status, fame, glory, recognition, attention, reputation, appreciation, dignity, even dominance. The higher form involves the need for self-respect, including such feelings as confidence, competence, achievement, mastery, independence, and freedom. Note that this is the "higher" form because, unlike the respect of others, once ...

Solution Summary

Explains the developmental stage of the humanistic theory of Maslow and Rogers as it relates to adulthood or being an adult. A supplementary artilcle on Rogers and references are provided.

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