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Mourning, Grief, and Adult Psychological Features

1. Do you think people in mourning behave differently according to their culture? In your opinion, is grief a universal emotion?

2. Since most Americans do not practice rites of passage, how do we know when adolescence ends and adulthood begins? What psychological features do we expect to see in adults?

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Please see attached response, which is also presented below. I also attached a highly informative article for extra reading and research. I hope this helps and take care.

RESPONSE:

Interesting questions! Let's take a closer look through discussion, research and examples.

1. Do you think people in mourning behave differently according to their culture? In your opinion, is grief a universal emotion?

Different cultures define grief and mourning differently. In the west, mourning and grief and separated, with grief being the subjective feelings associated with loss, and mourning the rituals associated with the loss (crying, funereal, prayers, etc.). However, the Japanese do not have a word for grief, so it is all considering mourning. However, universally, sadness and crying are expressions of loss.

Therefore, Klass (n.d.) argues that at the biological level it might seem that grief is universal and is associated wit a number of grieving emotions (sadness, hurt, etc). In every culture people cry or seem to want to cry after a death that is significant to them. Research suggests then that grief could be conceived as an instinctual response, ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses cultural differences in mourning and, if grief is a universal emotion. Since most Americans do not practice rites of passage, it also discusses how we do know when adolescence ends and adulthood begins, as well as the psychological features of grief expected to see in adults. Supplemented with a comparative cross cultural study on mourning.

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