Share
Explore BrainMass

A Culture of Disability

As counsellors need to be mindful of their own biases and prejudice toward individuals with a disability, develop a comparison of how the culture of disability (that is those who disabled) is similar to and different from other cultures. What issues and challenges are unique to people with disabilities? Finally, what are the implications of working with a person with a disability in counseling? Please use scholarly sources references

Solution Preview

(1) Develop a comparison of how the culture of disability (that is those who disabled) is similar to and different from other cultures.

Culture has a normative role in a given society It consists of standards for deciding what is, standards for deciding what can be, standards for deciding how one should feel, and standards for deciding how to go about daily activities (Goodenough, 1963 as cited in Eskay. Gardner, & Nyirenda, 1998). According to Eskay et al., the meanings understood in one's culture are based on the culture's standards.
Thus, what determines cultural standards is used to define what it means to be a human being. Based on the values that are placed on such attributes such as beauty, intelligence, gender, developmental theories, age, etc., the criteria for a "normal" human being is established. By contrast, often individuals below these standards are often considered abnormal and non-functioning.

For example, Intellectual disability as characterized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR [APA], 2000) is "characterized by deficits in general mental abilities, such as reasoning, problem ...

Solution Summary

This solution examines the culture of disability as it relates to counsellor's biases and the client's challenges.

$2.19