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Dyslexia, Brain Damage, and CNS Impairment

Edward is a seven-year-old boy who has difficulty reading. His teacher refers him to the school psychologist to evaluate for a learning disability. The psychologist's report concludes that Edward has dyslexia and mild central nervous system impairment. Edward's mother asks if the report means that her son has brain damage. The psychologist says, "He has impairments, but I wouldn't say that he is brain-damaged."

How would you explain this answer? What is dyslexia?

What are the different nuances of meaning associated with the expressions of brain damage and a central nervous system impairment?

Are we overly sensitive and fearful about the idea of brain damage in our culture? Is this fear justified?

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How would you explain this answer? What is dyslexia?

Those with dyslexia are not brain-damaged. It is neither a brain injury nor a disease, although it is a neurological disorder. Dyslexia is usually genetic and it is a language-based learning disability. Some refer to it as a reading disability. Children, like Edward, with dyslexia usually experience difficulties with language skills such as spelling, writing, and word pronunciation. The dyslexic brain is different from those without the disability. For instance, the dyslexic brain has five times more brain activity when performing a task, such as reading, than the non-dyslexic brain. Also, the dyslexic brain does not ...

Solution Summary

Dyslexia, Brain Damage and CNS Impairment is examined. How difference nuances of meaning associated with the expressions of brain damage and a central nervous system impairment is determined.

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