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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Select two personality theories. Compare and contrast the theories, describing each theory's application to Obsessive-Compulsive disorder.

Evaluate the effectiveness of at least two therapies used to treat the disorder.

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RESPONSE:

1. Select two personality theories. Compare and contrast the theories, describing each theory's application to Obsessive-Compulsive disorder.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is a disorder where a person find themselves repeating certain behaviors or thoughts again and again and again and again. Even though they know the repetition is unnecessary, they are unable to stop themselves. Examples are checking locks, stoves, and lights, or recurrent intrusive thoughts of hurting oneself or one's children. Most people with OCD usually experience severe anxiety if unable to complete their rituals, fear of getting germs and dying if they do wash their hands causes great anxiety. Therapies work by helping the individual learn that no catastrophe occurs when the behaviors do cease. Research suggests that the families have a problem understanding that the patient is unable to simply stop the behavior, but might get angry and upset when they are forced to deal with the time-consuming and unrealistic repetitive behaviors. This might be why many patients present ONLY with anxiety or depression and many patients do not volunteer their symptoms, and instead complain only of anxiety or depression. (1)

There have been many psychological theories proposed to explain the cause of OCD, but behavioural and cognitive theories have received the most support.

A. Behavioral Theory and Treatment

Behavioral theory proposes that:

o People with OCD associate certain objects or situations with fear, and that they learn to avoid the things they fear or to perform rituals that help reduce the fear.

o This pattern of fear and avoidance/ritual may begin when people are under periods of high emotional stress, such as starting a new job or ending a relationship.

o At such times, people are more vulnerable to fear and anxiety.

o Things once regarded as "neutral" may begin to bring on feelings of fear. For example, a person who has always been able to use public toilets may, when under stress, make a connection between the toilet seat and a fear of catching an illness.

o Once a connection between an object and the feeling of fear becomes established, people with OCD avoid the things they fear, rather than confront or tolerate the fear.

o For instance, the person who fears catching an illness from public toilets will avoid using them. When forced to use a public ...

Solution Summary

This solution compares two personality theories, as well as describes each theory's application to Obsessive-Compulsive disorder. It then evaluate the effectiveness of at least two therapies used to treat the disorder.

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