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Behavioral Deficits and Excesses

List at least two behavioral deficits and two behavioral excesses.

Once you are done, pick one of your behaviors to write a self-management plan for.

Outline a self-management strategy for the behavior that you chose from your table. This can be a deficit or an excess. The strategy must have the following:

- Target behavior with topographical definition.
- Objective for how you wish to increase or decrease this behavior.
- A support plan consisting of at least one antecedent intervention, one contingency-based aspect (e.g., reinforcement or punishment), a plan for getting extra support if you need it, and how you will evaluate the plan.

Solution Preview

(1) Target behavior with topographical definition.

Behaviors fall into a class—they can be topographical or functional. In other words, they look similar (topographical), but function different. In a discussion of behaviors fall into a class, and a behavioral therapist must be very precise regarding the behavior that he or she wants to target. The behavior selecting could be aggression resulting in disruption in class that include (a) hitting, (b) biting and (c) kicking (Behavioral principles, www.uni.edu).

(2) Objective for how you wish to increase or decrease this behavior

Research suggests that punishment for aggressive behavior should be followed by non-aggressive behavior (Bandura, Ross, & S. A. Ross, 1963). According to Bandura et al, if the client is not shown anti-aggressive behavior, the behavior will result in increases in antisocial behavior, delinquency and more aggressiveness. Moreover, children tend to emulate aggressive models more than non-aggressive models. For instance, continued punishment of a behavior may increase the behavior rather than decrease it. In other words, the behavior is reinforced. (Bandura, Ross, & S. A. Ross, 1961). At the outset, the client may initially be interviewed and an assessment made that is designed to: (a) observe and identify the target behavior, and through the collection of data (e.g. time, occurrence, intensity, etc.). The collection of data is focused on measuring internalizing and externalizing behaviors. During the interview, the target behavior is observed [e.g. hitting, kicking, and biting] (Becker, Arnold, & Thomas, 1967).

(3) Support plan consisting of at least one antecedent intervention, one contingency-based aspect (e.g., reinforcement or punishment), a plan for getting extra support if you need it, and how you will evaluate the plan.

(A) Individual Incentive Plan

- Interview, Identify (and pinpoint) the problem. The focus of an antecedent intervention is to focus on what it is that you want changed
- Pinpointing the problem helps to delineate the boundaries of the problem.
- It also helps to analyze both the strengths and limitations that can be built upon. The objective is to develop a management program to maximize the students' assets.
- Recording ...

Solution Summary

This solution describes behavioral deficits and excesses

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