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Evolution, Genetics, and Experience

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Modern genetics can prevent the tragedy of a life doomed by heredity; embryos can now be screened for some genetic diseases. But what constitutes a disease? Should genetic testing be used to select a child's characteristics? If so, what characteristics?

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1. Modern genetics can prevent the tragedy of a life doomed by heredity; embryos can now be screened for some genetic diseases. But what constitutes a disease?

Genetic diseases/disorders can include single gene disorders (e.g. autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, x-linked dominant, x-linked recessive, y-linked and mitochondrial) as well as multifactorial and polygenic (complex) disorders. (http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/single_gene/default.htm). Two other genetic disorders are chromosomal and mitochondrial. (http://www.ornl.gov/sci/techresources/Human_Genome/medicine/assist.shtml#disorders).

However, the ethical issue raised her is what diseases should be worthy enough to kill the baby fetus to prevent her or him from having a disease. There is no set guidelines of what diseases should be included. Therefore, it is a slippery slope. The pro-lifers argue that no reason is good enough to kill the unborn child. The pro-choicer, on the other hand, argue that they have the right to make a choice ...

Solution Summary

Modern genetics can prevent the tragedy of a life doomed by heredity; embryos can now be screened for some genetic diseases. This solution explores what constitutes a disease, and whether genetic testing should be used to select a child's characteristics; and if so, what characteristics should be included. References are provided.

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Genetics: Hardy-Weinburg, Alleles, Punnett Squares, and Genetic Drift

1) Consider the following population, represented by the genotypes of its members (N = 20). Is this population in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium? (see attachment for population).

2) If the parental generation of a particular population of humans has the following allele frequencies, E = 0.4/e = 0.6, what are the predicted genotype frequencies of the great, great, grand kids?

3) If both parents are heterozygotes for attached earlobes, and unattached earlobes (A) are dominant, what is the chance of their next child possessing attached earlobes? (Show Punnett Square).

4) Can genetic drift result in evolution? Why or why not?

See the attached file.

Please show all work and explain all answers thoroughly.

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