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Analysis: driving under influence

Identify any examples of bias presented by the author. If none exist, explain how you determined this.

Identify any areas that are vague or ambiguous. If none exist, explain how you determined this.

Identify and name any rhetorical devices used by the author. If none exist, explain how you determined this.

Identify and name any fallacies used by the author. If none exist, explain how you determined this.

State one argument made by the author.

Identify the premises and conclusion of the argument.

Is the author's argument valid or invalid, sound or unsound, strong or weak? Explain how you determined this.

Does the author use moral reasoning? If not, explain how you determined this.

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ANALYZE ARTICLE AND ANSWER QUESTIONS
1. Question: Identify any examples of bias presented by the author. If none exist, explain how you determined this.
Answer: The author believes there is a clear link between legal driving age and accidents: the older the drivers, the less the accident. But is it also possible that older drivers, like seniors, could be a problem? 13- year-old drivers equated with 16-year-old drivers.

2. Question: Identify any areas that are vague or ambiguous. If none exist, explain how you determined this.
Answer: The author believes that enforcing laws is more important than enacting the laws, for instance that of teenagers not driving with non family members. But he also believes that laws should be made to raise the driving age. Would the driving age make the enforcement of the law more effective then?

3. Question: Identify and name any rhetorical devices used by the author. If none exist, explain how you determined this.
Answer: It's simple and inarguable: car crashes are the No. 1 cause of death among 15- to 20-year-olds in this country. Put it this way: if someone told you that there was one single behavior that would be most likely to lead to the premature death of your kid, wouldn't you try to do something about that?

4. Question: Identify and name any fallacies used by the author. If none exist, explain how you determined this.
Answer: In 1984 a solution was devised for the problem of teenage auto accidents that lulled many parents into a false sense of security. The drinking age was raised from 18 to 21. It's become gospel that this has saved thousands of lives, although no one actually knows if that's the case; fatalities fell, but the use of seat belts and airbags may have as much to do with that as penalties for alcohol use. And there has been a pronounced negative effect on college campuses, where administrators describe a forbidden-fruit climate that encourages binge drinking. The pitchers of sangria and kegs of beer that offered legal refreshment for 18-year-olds at sanctioned campus events 30 years ago have given way to a new tradition called "pre-gaming," in which dry college activities are preceded by manic alcohol consumption at frats, dorms and bars.
Given the incidence of auto-accident deaths among teenagers despite the higher drinking age, you have to ask whether the powerful ...

Solution Summary

Does the society trade lives with the freedom of very young to drive? Find out the pros and cons of this interesting argument.

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