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The Hippocratic Oath and Confiedentiality

Confidentiality appears to be both common sense and professional convention, as per the Hippocratic Oath, in the sense that "what [a healthcare professional] may see or hear in the course of treatment or even outside of the treatment in regard to the life of [patients]... [they] will keep to [themselves]." This seems to be an obligation not only of those who are called up to take the oath as a matter of course, but *all* healthcare professionals.

Are the instances in which private medical information should be revealed to others in order to protect individuals or the public from harm?

Explain your position using ethical reasoning and/or theories.

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OTA 105878/Xenia Jones

The Hippocratic Oath & Privacy

It appears thus that confidentiality between patient and doctor and other healthcare professionals (nurses, specialists, support workers) seem to be standard in the practice. But if confidentiality between patient and healthcare professional is so intrinsic in the relationship, then it trumps the Code of Ethics normally expected to govern a particular healthcare profession (i.e. the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics or ANA). I believe that confidentiality between patient and doctor is important for it fosters trust but Hippocrates also proposed obligation to humanity and this proposes, in my mind that the oath, while espousing primary responsibility ...

Solution Summary

The solution is a 556-word discussion of the Hippocratic Oath in relation to confidentiality and privacy in the practice of medicine and related fields.