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Determinism and Punishment

Imagine that hard determinism is true. Would there be any justification for punishment? Why or why not?

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The concise narrative below discusses determinism and free will as it relates to crime and punishment. I hope this solution helps.

OTA 105878/Xenia Jones

Determinism, Free Will and Punishment

Siegel (2004) defines crime and criminology from a legal perspective as "...crime which involves acts that interfere with the operations of society and the ability of people to function efficiently...." In other words, it is deviant behaviour that becomes criminalized because it has become disruptive and uncontrollable, i.e., informal ways of dealing with it has not resulted to any positive result. But what if the criminal has no control over what he have become - his choices, his persuasions, and his behaviours. What if he lived in a reality where determinism is true?

'Free Will' is a term that we refer to when we rational a choice of actions in the manner by which we conduct our lives. While it can be a simplistic explanation for individual choices, it also implies religious, ethical & scientific grounds to our actions whether or not we consciously acknowledge it during the fact. Debate rages on to this day whether or not 'free will' is what it actually connotes to us linguistically - is it a total freedom of choice or is it determined and caused. If such is the case is it really 'free' as we imply it to be? Can freedom coexist with something that is already determined? Determinism per se holds that ever event, every human behaviour ...

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The solution, a concise essay on determinism, free will and punishment as it relates to justice, cause and the law is written in APA-format. References are provided and sources cited. A word version of the solution is attached for easy printing.