Share
Explore BrainMass

A discussion regarding the nature of truth.

1.According to Mackie, what do disagreements about moral codes reflect? Do you agree? Why or why not?
Mackie says that disagreements about moral codes reflect a difference in beliefs that societies hold to rather than a difference in truth itself. Truth is absolute while beliefs are relative.

Yes, I agree with Mackie.

In nearly every area of life there is absolute truth. This is true of science, math, the weather, etc. We base our lives on the belief that absolute truth really exists. The only thing we disagree on is who gets to decide what the absolute truth is. For example, an evolutionist claims to be open-minded and not be blinded by legalistic, religious ideas. However, in an open discussion with a creationist the evolutionist begins his discussion with the admitted assumption that God cannot and does not exist. Well, that is an absolute statement completely removed from science.

There are many other issues that we as an American society believe to be absolutely true.
? Pre-meditated, cold-blooded murder is wrong.
? Human trafficking is wrong.
? Pedophiles should be incarcerated.
? Government should not establish a national religion.
If we do not believe that some truths are absolute then how do we justify believing in these laws and values? The truth is that nearly all people do believe that truth is absolute they just disagree on who should determine what those absolutes are.

Solution Preview

Questions/Answers:

1.According to Mackie, what do disagreements about moral codes reflect? Do you agree? Why or why not?
Mackie says that disagreements about moral codes reflect a difference in beliefs that societies hold to rather than a difference in truth itself. Truth is absolute while beliefs are relative.

Yes, I agree with Mackie.

In nearly every area of life there is absolute truth. This is true of science, math, the weather, etc. We base our lives on the belief that absolute truth really exists. The only thing we disagree on is who gets to decide what the absolute truth is. For example, an evolutionist claims to be open-minded and not be blinded by legalistic, religious ideas. However, in an open discussion with a creationist the evolutionist begins his discussion with the admitted assumption that God cannot and does not exist. Well, that is an absolute statement completely removed from science.

There are many other issues that we as an American society believe to be absolutely true.
? Pre-meditated, cold-blooded murder is wrong.
? Human trafficking is wrong.
? Pedophiles should be incarcerated.
? Government should not establish a national religion.
If we do not believe that some truths are absolute then how do we justify believing in these laws and values? The truth is that nearly all people do believe that truth is absolute they just disagree on who should determine what those absolutes are.

2.Give two examples of a moral practice that you think seems to be culturally relative.

1. A good one that I can think of is losing your temper. Now, an American would say "what's the big deal, everyone loses their temper." In America we have been conditioned to accept the fact that people lose their ...

Solution Summary

This is a discussion about truth and its nature. Is truth relative or absolute? How does society's view of truth impact its people and quality of life? Over 1,200 words of original text.

$2.19