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Juvenile Corrections and Rehabilitation

1) Is it possible to reconcile the dual objectives of a juvenile correctional and rehabilitation institution and of public or staff safety issues?

2) How can positive change be measured while a juvenile is in secure confinement? How can you ensure these behaviors transition from detention to the community?

3) What is your opinion of returning a juvenile offender to the public school system after a period of secure confinement?

4) In most correctional settings for juveniles, two primary modalities affect the juvenile at all times: strict discipline and nurture-based treatment. Do you think these two modalities operate to the benefit or the detriment of the juvenile?

5) If a previously incarcerated and now-on-parole juvenile is not able to function or succeed in a public school setting, what would you recommend as an appropriate action?

6) As a parole officer, how would you handle a juvenile who will turn 18 years old in 2 months and who persistently violates his curfew, which is a condition of his parole program?

Solution Preview

1) Is it possible to reconcile the dual objectives of a juvenile correctional and rehabilitation institution and of public or staff safety issues?

Yes. The juvenile correctional and rehabilitative systems seek to reform youth. If youth were on the streets without rehabilitation or reform programming, then they would be a danger to public safety. In that sense, public safety is improved by juvenile correctional and rehabilitative institutions more than merely incarcerating members because rehabilitation helps improve the offenders, while incarceration often just hardens youth who eventually return to society as worse criminals. See, http://www.nlada.org/DMS/Documents/1100534583.37/1113JUVIES-MAIN14.html. Following the same logic, institution staff are better protected when juveniles are offered reform because the staff are dealing with a group who is working to be less violent. If juveniles do not receive reform or rehabilitation, then they are might be more likely to behave violently toward staff. As long as the institution makes staff and youth safety a priority then the two are reconcilable. For example, see http://dhhs.ne.gov/children_family_services/Pages/jus_yrtc_aboutyrtcg.aspx.

2) How can positive change be measured while a juvenile is in secure confinement? How can you ensure these behaviors transition from detention to the community?

Change can be measured through objective standards. Positive changes can be measured by observing behavior, e.g., has the youth stopped throwing objects, or has the youth stopped striking others? For example, http://www.edra.org/sites/default/files/publications/EDRA04-Hahn-138-149_1.pdf. Positive changes in attitude can be measured through ...

Solution Summary

Juvenile corrections and rehabilitation are examined. How positive change can be measured while a juvenile is in secure confinement is determined.

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