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War and Culture - Our Civil War Poetry

They open a window to see the relationship between war and culture in ways that other readings just cannot - through personal experience. Our Civil War poetry is located on the web at www.civilwarpoetry.org Please read: Melville, "On the Slain at Chickamauga"; Roche, "Gettysburg"; Thompson, "The High Tide at Gettysburg"; Longfellow, "Killed at the Ford" and "The Cumberland"; Finch, "The Blue and the Gray"; Bierce, "The Hesitating Veteran"; Whitman, "Beat, Drums, Beat!," "O Captain, My Captain!," and "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd."

Choose any poem from the ones listed above and explicate it in terms of the writer's views on the Civil War, with a minimum of 200 words.

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"KILLED AT THE FORD" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)

Henry Longfellow was a notorious author during the Civil War period who often expressed his views through poetry. The poem itself was a derivative of a soldier who was killed while on guard from a sniper's bullet in front of his soldiers. As we can see in the first paragraph of the poem, the soldier killed is described as youthful, humorous, ...

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They open a window to see the relationship between war and culture in ways that other readings just cannot - through personal experience. Our Civil War poetry is located on the web at www.civilwarpoetry.org Please read: Melville, "On the Slain at Chickamauga"; Roche, "Gettysburg"; Thompson, "The High Tide at Gettysburg"; Longfellow, "Killed at the Ford" and "The Cumberland"; Finch, "The Blue and the Gray"; Bierce, "The Hesitating Veteran"; Whitman, "Beat, Drums, Beat!," "O Captain, My Captain!," and "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd."

Choose any poem from the ones listed above and explicate it in terms of the writer's views on the Civil War, with a minimum of 200 words.

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