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Inhibitory Techniques

Inhibition of overactive neuromuscular tissue is an effective 'stretching' technique in the overall continuum of flexibility. However, not every client responds to these methods identically. From your experiences, what have been some 'adverse' effects of these inhibitory techniques, and what modifications have you made (or would you make) to continue the application of the technique?

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Hi,

Another interesting question! Let's take a closer look.

1. Inhibition of overactive neuromuscular tissue is an effective 'stretching' technique in the overall continuum of flexibility. However, not every client responds to these methods identically. From your experiences, what have been some 'adverse' effects of these inhibitory techniques, and what modifications have you made (or would you make) to continue the application of the technique?

Generally inhibitory techniques fall under the rubrics of muscle energy technique (MET), an umbrella term encompassing various types of active muscular relaxation and/or stretching procedures. Two cornerstones of MET are reciprocal inhibition (RI) and post-isometric relaxation (PIR). RI, in theory, takes advantage of the neurologic phenomenon of muscular contraction, resulting in an inhibitory effect on antagonistic muscles (Sherrington's law). For example, a contraction of the knee extensors will result in an inhibition or ...

Solution Summary

Inhibition of overactive neuromuscular tissue is an effective 'stretching' technique in the overall continuum of flexibility. However, not every client responds to these methods identically. By example, this solution discusses some 'adverse' effects of these inhibitory techniques, as well as the types of modifications that a trainer could make to continue the application of the technique.

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