Explore BrainMass

Explore BrainMass

    Is there a "right" to die?

    Not what you're looking for? Search our solutions OR ask your own Custom question.

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    Take a position on the following statement:

    Our current acceptance of a right to die, especially for those who are unconscious and need a proxy decision maker, is a rather slippery slope that may, in the future, be used not to protect individual autonomy or privacy but rather to serve as a facade to rid us of individuals whose lives we do not value.

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com March 4, 2021, 6:21 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/health-sciences/health-care-ethics/is-there-a-right-to-die-41373

    Solution Preview

    This is a very interesting proposition which I believe has significant merit. Much has been written comparing the current moral decline in Western culture to trends that existed in post-Weimar Germany. The comparisons are vital. One of the classic treatises outlining the philosophic similarities between modern American society and the rationalist school of German philosophers such as Hegel (the rational is real and the real is rational), is the book entitled "The Closing of the American Mind" by Allan Bloom. Bloom nicely distinguishes between the current trend to emphasize "values" and the historic grounding in understanding "good and evil."

    Today, in the highly politicized "death culture," we have this reality in spades. Good and evil? What are they? On the other hand, everyone feels comfortable speaking of values. Values are ...

    Solution Summary

    Much has been written comparing the current moral decline in Western culture to trends that existed in post-Weimar Germany. We distinguish between "values" and "good and evil" by considering the work of philosopher Allan Bloom. In addition, we address this question within the context of the proper role for government.

    $2.49

    ADVERTISEMENT