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    Sampling Techniques, Measurement, Reliability and Validity

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    Using the following scenario:

    There are 500 people in Chicago who suffer from a particular condition. You want to survey these people and you decide that since the survey instrument is long, you will give a monetary incentive of $15 to each of the individuals who completes the survey. You only have enough money to pay 45 people so you decide to draw a sample of 65 individuals because you can expect that there will be some attrition.

    QUESTION:

    Your supervisor points out a few drawbacks to your design. Discuss what these are/would be.

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    https://brainmass.com/health-sciences/evaluation-measurement-and-research-methods/sampling-techniques-measurement-reliability-and-validity-151008

    Solution Preview

    This is an interesting scenario! Let's take a closer look at some of the potential drawbacks that your supervisor might bring up for the following scenario.

    1. Using the following scenario: There are 500 people in Chicago who suffer from a particular condition. You want to survey these people and you decide that since the survey instrument is long, you will give a monetary incentive of $15 to each of the individuals who completes the survey. You only have enough money to pay 45 people so you decide to draw a sample of 65 individuals because you can expect that there will be some attrition. Your supervisor points out a few drawbacks to your design. Discuss what these are/would be (include any citations if used and where necessary).

    Despite controversy about paying research subjects, many documented research pay individuals to participate in the study, so this would probably NOT be considered a drawback by the supervisor. For example, in a study to document current U.S. practices regarding payment to research subjects, money was offered in a wide variety of study types, from short term physiologic studies to large clinical trials of therapeutic interventions, to both patient (61%) and healthy (24.4%) subjects or both (14.6%). Interestingly, dollar amounts varied widely and were infrequently explicitly described as based on time (19%) or procedures (12%). Unexplained variation in dollar amounts occurred in similar studies or in the same (multi-site) study at different sites, and for similar procedures across studies sometimes even within one site. Although the range was wide ($5-$2000), total amounts were usually modest (overall median $155), and almost always described in the consent form (94.4%) and usually as pro-rated (73%). The authors conclude ...

    Solution Summary

    Based on the scenario, this solution discusses a few drawbacks to the design.

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