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Isaac Asimov

1. Agree or disagree with Asimov's statement: "My intelligence, then, is not absolute but is a function of the society I live in and of the fact that a small subsection of that society has managed to foist itself on the rest as an arbiter of such matters." Explain your answer.

2. How would you define intelligence?

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Please refer to file response attached (also attached below). I hope this helps and take care.

RESPONSE:

1. Agree or disagree with Asimov's statement: "My intelligence, then, is not absolute but is a function of the society I live in and of the fact that a small subsection of that society has managed to foist itself on the rest as an arbiter of such matters." Explain your answer.

I would disagree, for the most part, with Asimov's statement. Intelligence is an innate quality, not a function of the society we live in. Intelligence is fairly stable over time, fluctuating several pints as a function of education. Asimov seems to be talking more about a person's abilities and achievements, which are experienced-based, a function of society. Abilities and achievements, as opposed to intelligence, are not absolute, but could be seen as functions ...

Solution Summary

This solution evaluates and explains Isaac Asimov's statement: "My intelligence, then, is not absolute but is a function of the society I live in and of the fact that a small subsection of that society has managed to foist itself on the rest as an arbiter of such matters." It then provides a definition for intelligence.

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