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    What is a rhetoric question? Include a definition of erotema, anacoenosis, anthypophora, dianoea, aporia, epiplexis, exuscitatio, pysma and ratiocinatio. Provide examples of each.

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    1. What is a rhetoric question? Include a definition of the following concepts: erotema, anacoenosis, anthypophora, dianoea, aporia, epiplexis, exuscitatio, pysma and ratiocinatio. Give several examples.

    The rhetorical question is usually defined as any question asked for a purpose other than to obtain the information the question asks.

    For example, "Why are you so stupid?" is likely to be a statement regarding one's opinion of the person addressed rather than a genuine request to know. Similarly, when someone responds to a tragic event by saying, "Why me, God?!" it is more likely to be an accusation or an expression of feeling than a realistic request for information.

    Rhetorical questions are also (at least sometimes) about asking questions not intended to gain information but to assert more emphatically the obvious answer to what is asked. Sometimes, 'no answer', in fact, is expected by the speaker. The device is illustrated in the following series of sentences: "Did you help me when I needed help? Did you once offer to intercede in my behalf? Did you do anything to lessen my load?"

    Other types of rhetoric questions include:

    Apart from these more obviously rhetorical uses, the question as a grammatical form has important rhetorical dimensions. For example, the rhetorical critic may assess the effect of asking a question as a method of beginning discourse: "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" says the persona of Shakespeare's 18th sonnet. This kind of rhetorical question, in which one asks the opinion of those listening, is called anacoenosis. This rhetorical question has a definite ethical dimension, since to ask in this way generally endears the speaker to the audience and so improves his or her credibility or ethos. The technical term for rhetorical questions in general is erotema.

    A. Erotema (see http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/E/erotema.htm)

    B. Anacoenosis: Asking the opinion or judgment of the judges or audience

    Examples: And now, O inhabitants of Jerusalem, and men of Judah, judge, I pray you, betwixt me and my vineyard. What could I have done more to my vineyard, that I have not done in it? ?Isaiah 5:3-4; Now I ask you to decide: Given the persecution my client has undergone, does he not deserve to have some justifiable anger?

    Source: http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/A/anacoenosis.htm.

    C. Anthypophora: A figure of reasoning in which one asks and then immediately answers one's own questions. Reasoning aloud.

    Examples: "But there are only three hundred of us," you object. Three hundred, yes, but men, but armed, but Spartans, but at Thermoplyae: I have never seen three hundred so numerous.?Seneca

    See http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/A/anthypophora.htm.

    D. Anthypophora sometimes takes the form of asking the audience or one's adversary what can be said on a matter, and thus can involve both anacoenosis and apostrophe.

    Examples:

    "But there are only three hundred of us," you object. Three hundred, yes, but men, but armed, but Spartans, but at Thermoplyae: I have never seen three hundred so numerous.?Seneca

    Source: http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/A/anthypophora.htm.

    E. Dianoea: The use of animated questions and answers in developing an argument (sometimes simply the equivalent of anthypophora) (source:http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/D/dianoea.htm).

    F. Aporia: Deliberating with oneself as though in doubt over some matter; asking oneself (or rhetorically asking one's hearers) what is the best or appropriate way to approach something.

    Examples: Where shall I begin to describe her wisdom? In her knowledge of facts? In her ability to synthesize diverse matters? In her capacity to articulate complex ideas simply?

    Source: http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/A/aporia.htm.

    G. Epiplexis: Asking questions in order to chide, to express grief, or to inveigh.

    Examples: Why died I not from the womb? why did I not give up the ghost when I came out of the belly? ?Job 3:11

    Source: http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/E/epiplexis.htm

    H. Exuscitatio: Stirring others by one's own vehement feeling (sometimes by means of a rhetorical question).

    Examples: Can I stand by and let the government trample on my rights? Is that safe? Is that right? Can any of us afford to allow this wrong to continue?

    Source: http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/E/exuscitatio.htm.

    I. Pysma: The asking of multiple questions successively (which would together require a complex reply). A rhetorical use of the question.

    Source: http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/P/pysma.htm.

    J. Ratiocinatio: Reasoning (typically with oneself) by asking questions. Sometimes equivalent to anthypophora.

    Examples: Old age is superior to youth. Why? The body has been tamed and the mind ripened with wisdom.

    Source: http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/R/ratiocinatio.htm

    FINAL COMMENTS I HOPE THIS IS HELPFUL! TAKE CARE!

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

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