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Bloom's Taxonomy and Task Analysis for Special Ed.

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Being able to break a task into its constituent parts and identifying what skills will be needed to complete a curricular activity is an important part of modifying curriculum for special needs students. The formal process for performing this function is referred to as a task analysis.

1. Analyze the purpose of a task analysis for special education students in relation to teaching reasoning, problem solving skills, study skills, organizational skills, and coping skills.
2. What two specific tasks that you would like to teach. Please describe your two tasks and create a task analysis for each of your two tasks showing the component parts that students would actually do for each task. Be sure to create specific, observable steps for each task analysis.
3. Using Bloom's Taxonomy; analyze your tasks and apply all levels of the taxonomy as appropriate for your tasks. (use the revised version of Bloom's Taxonomy, which can be found easily online).
4. How does each level of Bloom's Taxonomy applies to your tasks, and how would you demonstrate how you would try to move your students through the levels of the taxonomy toward higher levels of thinking.

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1. The purpose of task analysis for special education students is to develop Individual Educational Plans for special education students that state how the performance of these students will be measured by teachers. Included within these measurements are detailed written lists that monitor discrete steps that are included within the task to ensure that the special education student is successfully transitioning through the task. The reasoning is analyzed by determining whether the student understands a task such as putting his or her jacket on. The importance of this task in cold weather will be explained to determine if the student understands the severity or complications that will occur if he or she is unable to place this protective barrier on. The problem solving skills would entail the student being able to account for any difficulties that could emerge from their physical limitations that would complicate putting the jacket on. If a student has coordination issues, the teacher should instruct them on how to put the jacket on despite their physical limitations by showing them how to effectively do so. Study skills for this task would entail following the instructions of the teacher and studying upon how to consistently do this task at school, home, or other places. Practicing the task would entail the best option possible for these students to gain an understanding of how ...

Solution Summary

This solution provides an explanation of how to create a task analysis for special education courses based upon Bloom's taxonomy.

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Psychomotor Domain Performance Gap Analysis

Psychomotor Domain Performance Gap Analysis

1050-1400-word paper that examines the role of Bloom's performance model in identifying performance gaps for an activity in the psychomotor domain (e.g., juggling, playing a musical instrument, learning to play a sport, etc.). Identify each level in the psychomotor domain and provide examples of a gap in performance for each level.

Conduct a search for Bloom's psychomotor domain to access the psychomotor categories as developed by Simpson (1972). Please use this reference as a starting point for the assignment.

The psychomotor domain refers to the use of basic motor skills, coordination, and physical movement. Bloom's research group did not develop in-depth categories of this domain, claiming lack of experience in teaching these skills. However, Simpson (1972) developed seven psychomotor categories to support Bloom's domain.
The psychomotor domain refers to the use of basic motor skills, coordination, and physical movement. Bloom's research group did not develop in-depth categories of this domain, claiming lack of experience in teaching these skills. However, Simpson (1972) developed seven psychomotor categories to support Bloom's domain.
Origination a learner's ability to create new movement patterns
Adaptation a learner's ability to modify motor skills to fit a new situation
Complex Overt Response the intermediate stage of learning a complex skill
Mechanism the ability to perform a complex motor skill
Guided Response the early stage of learning a complex skill which includes imitation
Set a learner's readiness to act
Perception the ability to use sensory cues to guide physical activity

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