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Students with Intellectual Disabilities

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As a current or future leader in special education, identify an educational level of interest such as elementary, middle, or high school. (Please use middle school)

Explain how you would structure special education services for students with intellectual disabilities in literacy and mathematics to provide learning support within both special education and inclusive, general education classroom settings. Include the instructional qualities and approaches you would want your special education teachers to possess and why you think those are important qualities and approaches.

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Welcome to BrainMass! Please rate 5/5 for my sample ideas and references. These ideas are not essay or assignment ready, merely guidance to jump start your own inquiries.

As a middle school leader in special education, I would structure special education services for students with intellectual disabilities in literacy and mathematics with vertical team alignment, common planning time, and ongoing sharing/professional development to provide learning support within both special education and inclusive, general education classroom settings. I would also advocate a whole-child approach, as well as one that involves strong collaboration and frequent communication, co-teaching, co-planning, and co-assessing, among all teachers, counselors, and staff.

Likewise in terms of stronger teacher alignment and consistency, I would further help teachers to use more explicit and systematic literacy teaching, learning techniques that enable students with ID "to apply skills across contexts and make connections among related skills. Students with ID benefit from routine language that is repeated across lessons and contexts (e.g., reading and writing; general education classroom, resource room) so instructions are quickly understood. A student with ID may not make the necessary connection if one teacher refers to sight words as "outlaw words" while another refers to them as "look-and-say words." Teachers should also explicitly teach connections among related skills (e.g., ...

Solution Summary

700 words of notes and references guide a discussion about best strategies for teachers to use with students in middle school with intellectual disabilities, primarily in Math and Literacy.

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