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Socioeconomic status of children's education

Think about the socioeconomic status of students in your neighborhood school.
Are they similar or different? If they are different, in what ways? How do differences between your SES background and your students hinder your teaching? How do you ensure that your perceptions and assumptions do not impede student learning?
Does the difference affect the way you teach your students? If so, how?
If someone were to visit your classroom (or neighborhood school) without knowing anything about the school, would the visitor be able to easily identify your students' SES? Yours?
In what ways might this be possible?
Think about the teaching materials that are available in your classroom. Do any of the objects in your room have a special meaning in a different culture? How can you find out?

Please provide references.

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Think about the socioeconomic status students in your neighborhood school.
Are they similar or different? If they are different, in what ways? How do differences between your SES background and your students hinder your teaching? How do you ensure that your perceptions and assumptions do not impede student learning?

The socioeconomic status of students at Montgomery High School in Montgomery Tx is very different. The school is a predominately white school in the richest school district in the county. Nevertheless, the 10% of minority students that attend the school have a low SES while the majority of white students have a very high SES status. These differences hinder teaching in regard to ensuring that standardized tests that are used don't involve biased words and phrases that aren't commonly used by minorities who don't live in areas such as Bentwater, April Sound, or Walden where houses are $300,000 and up. The teacher doesn't have to alter their teaching style in any other areas because the richest school district is actually a blessing for students with low SES as they have access ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses the impact of socioeconomic status on children's education.

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