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    How on-line library statistics could be manipulated versus that of a traditional library (a hybrid of the two questions).

    The question is :

    How does a search engine determine who comes first? Do they pay money for this privilege?

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com October 9, 2019, 5:10 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/education/learning-teaching/search-engine-49923

    Solution Preview

    SO THE QUESTION IS HOW DOES A SEARCH ENGINE DETERMINE WHO COMES UP FIRST? DO THEY PAY MONEY FOR THIS PRIVILAGE?

    Good question. As far as I know, people do not pay for this privilege; it is more about knowing how to design the search engine to optimize on their knowledge and market presence. Concepts like "link popularity" and "PageRank," etc. determine who comes up first. Also, when designing your own website, it is also about knowing how to design your website (i.e., number of optimal links, etc.) that will increase the likelihood of bringing your site to the top of the list. It is not an exact science, though, and things change rapidly.
    Let's look at a couple of examples for illustrative purposes to further explore how concepts like "link popularity" and "PageRank" determine who comes up first.
    Example: Google
    Around 2001, the Google search engine rose to prominence. Its success was based in part on the concept of link popularity and PageRank. How many other web sites and web pages link to a given page is taken into consideration with PageRank, on the premise that good or desirable pages are linked to more than others. The PageRank of linking pages and the number of links on these pages contribute to the PageRank of the linked page. This makes it possible for Google to order its results by how many web sites link to each found page. Google's minimalist user interface was very popular with users, and has since spawned a number of imitators.
    Google and most other web engines utilize not only PageRank but more than 150 criteria to determine relevancy. The algorithm "remembers" where it has been and indexes the number of cross-links and relates these into groupings. PageRank is based on citation analysis that was developed in the 1950s by Dr. Eugene Garfield at the University of Pennsylvania. Google's founders cite Garfield's work in their original paper. In this way virtual communities of webpages are found. Teoma's search technology uses a communities approach in its ranking algorithm. NEC Research Institute has worked on similar technology. Web link analysis was first developed by Dr. Jon Kleinberg and his team while working on the CLEVER project at IBM's Almaden research lab. ...

    Solution Summary

    This solution examines how a search engine determines who comes first and if they pay money for this privilege.

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