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Scoring rubrics and FERPA

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Design TWO scoring rubrics
1. The holistic rubric should include descriptors for the quality of the overall paper. (List what a 4 paper looks like as a whole, a 3 paper, and a 2 paper) This is all assumed that you are grading on a four-level tier. Instead you could describe what an A paper looks like, a B paper looks like, etc. The point for a holistic rubric is you grade the paper as a WHOLE. All descriptors are listed underneath the score.
2. The rating scale rubric should include specific descriptors for spelling/grammar/punctuation, organization, content, and any other items you want to include. A rating scale rubric will list each of the above characteristics and how you can earn X amount of points for each. Think of it as a graph list your descriptors on the X axis, the points possible (4, 3, 2, 1) or (Very Good, Good, Satisfactory, Needs Improvement) on the Y axis. Then, fill in the graph stating what do I need for content to earn a 4, a 3, a 2. Then do each descriptor separately.

It is parent conference time and it is required that you conference with each student's parents. Your classroom enrollment is 35 students. Some of the students are special needs students, LEP students or students who have some other type of disability. You would like to combine conferences by creating conference groups. Is this an appropriate strategy for conferencing? Why or Why not? Use FERPA as a basis for your argument.

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** See ATTACHED file for an easier-to-read version of the tables **

The directions for the rubrics specify that you create two of them.

>> Design TWO scoring rubrics <<

I would begin with the second requested rubric first, because you can use the descriptors you create for it to complete the holistic rubric requested for step 1.

2. The rating scale rubric should include specific descriptors for spelling/grammar/punctuation, organization, content, and any other items you want to include. A rating scale rubric will list each of the above characteristics and how you can earn X amount of points for each. Think of it as a graph: list your descriptors on the X axis, the points possible (4,3,2,1) or (Very Good, Good, Satisfactory, Needs Improvement) on the Y axis. Then, fill in the graph stating: what do I need for content to earn a 4, a 3, a 2. Then do each descriptor separately.

Please understand that what you are assessing in this rubric determines its descriptors, or its criteria. If you are teaching ESOL students, you may NOT be scoring their developing grammar and mechanical skills, you just want them to practice putting ideas down on paper in English, mistakes or not. In that case, you would not want to include criteria for correct grammar and proper formatting, since you are mostly interested in content. What you are interested in assessing determines the content of the scoring rubric, and that might be different even class-to-class, or student-to-student (that's called differentiation).

To create a rubric, I like to create a table in MS Word. To do this in the 2003 version, Click on the menu header TABLE, and then INSERT TABLE. Choose, based on a sketch or planned-out document, how many rows and columns you will need. Don't worry if you put too many or not enough at first, they can be added or deleted later, as required. The table will look something like this one. I included a 0 point response, for those times when a student did not attempt a criteria - you don't want to give them a 1 for a "no-effort" lack of response

Criteria 0 points 1 point 2 points 3 points 4 points

Now, fill in your criteria, and the descriptors for each level of response. SUGGESTED criteria have been included here, converted from the rubric I use pasted below this one.

Criteria 0 points 1 point 2 points 3 points 4 points
Essay on topic NO Frequently or completely off topic Sort of, wanders off a lot Sort of, wanders off a little On topic throughout
Formatting :
Indent, etc, NO Formatting mostly incorrect Many errors Some errors, mostly correct Formatting correct
Spelling NO, illegible Many errors Some errors Few errors No errors
Grammar :
Sub-verb
Sentence frag, etc. NO Many errors Some errors Few errors No errors
Punctuation:
commas,etc. NO Many errors Some errors Few errors No errors
Diction:
word choice NO Poor, many often repeated Some repetitions, unimaginative Some repetetions Good choices, varied
Content:
logical, supported, flow, transitions NO Poor logic, unsupported, poor transitions, rough read Logic OK, Some support, some awkward transitions, OK read Excellent reasoning, supported, smooth transitions, good read
AT LEAST 5 paragraphs NO One paragraph, or two skimpy Two or three paragraphs Three or four paragraphs Five or more

A completed rubric that I use for 5 paragraph essays is copied and pasted below for you. I created this one, it is my original work, not one obtained from the Internet. These are the things I look for in a student's essay - non-ESOL students. My rubric uses a two point division for each descriptor (0, 1, 3 and 5 points) which allows me to ...

Solution Summary

Discussion of and creation of two scoring rubrics, one holistic and 1 4-point. examples and models, with Web URL references. Additionally discussion of parent conferences and FERPA legalities teachers must know and observe to avoid losing their certification.

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