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    The Individualized Education Program (IEP)

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    Are there any special considerations in the design of an IEP for a student with multiple disabilities compared to an IEP for a student with one disability in Math and English Language Arts that are supported by research-based instructional strategies?

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    https://brainmass.com/education/autism/individualized-education-program-iep-612347

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    Please see some helpful tips (looks like you will be working on this issue for a while-so this link should come in very handy as a guide)...Your limit was also 1 credit-so I have provided you with enough information to draw from. Thanks for using Brainmass and feel free to assign help to me going forward.
    Dr J

    Please see: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/iepguidance/intro.htm

    Individualized Education Program Guidance

    Introduction

    Research and experience has shown that to improve results for students with disabilities, schools must:
    •have high expectations for students with disabilities;
    •meet the student's needs to enable the student to access, participate and progress in the general education curriculum to the maximum extent possible;
    •ensure that parents have meaningful opportunities to participate in the development, review and revision of the individualized education program (IEP);
    •ensure that families have meaningful opportunities to participate in the education of their children at school and at home;
    •ensure that special education is a service, rather than a place where students are sent;
    •provide appropriate special education services and supplementary supports and services in the general education classroom, whenever appropriate;
    •provide effective systems of school-wide, classroom, small group and individualized systems of behavior supports;
    •ensure that all those who work with students with disabilities have the skills and knowledge necessary to help such students to meet academic and functional goals;
    •prepare students for their transition to adult living, working and learning to lead productive independent adult lives to the maximum extent possible;
    •provide high quality research-based instruction and supports; and
    •focus resources on teaching and learning.

    The IEP is the cornerstone of the special education process for each individual student. It is the tool to document how one student's special needs related to his/her disability will be met within the context of an educational environment. This guidance document provides important information for Committees on Preschool Special Education (CPSE) and Committees on Special Education (CSE)1 in developing IEPs that are reasonably calculated to result in educational benefit to a student.

    Developing IEPs Linked to the Standards

    "The New York State Standards apply to all students, regardless of their experiential background, capabilities, developmental learning differences, interests or ambitions. There are multiple pathways to learn effectively, participate meaningfully and work towards attaining the curricular standards. Students with a wide range of abilities may pursue multiple pathways to learn effectively, participate meaningfully and work toward attaining the curricular standards." (Learning Standards for English-Language Arts, New York State Education Department, March 1996).

    The New York State Learning Standards include learning standards, performance indicators and sample tasks a student is expected to know or demonstrate at different levels (alternate, elementary, intermediate and commencement). Standards serve as the basis for developing instructional curriculum.

    In developing a student's IEP, it is the responsibility of the Committee to recommend goals and services that will assist the student to be involved and progress in the general education curriculum (or for preschool students, in appropriate activities). This means that members of a Committee will need to consider both the State's learning standards as well as the school-based instructional curriculum, which should be aligned to the State's learning standards. They will need to know the expectations of the general education classroom for the corresponding age of the student both in terms of what learning is expected (general curriculum) as well as how the students are expected to access/demonstrate that learning. This information will assist the Committee in determining if the student needs adaptations, accommodations, or modifications to the general curriculum for all or part of his/her learning. This is one reason it is essential that the student's general education teacher(s) participate in the Committee meetings and for the school district representative to be knowledgeable about the general education curriculum.

    To develop IEPs that are linked to the standards, the Committee should:
    1.Review the content as well as the expectations for how the student will learn or demonstrate knowledge and skill in the content areas.
    2.Identify the strengths and challenges for the student in relation to those expectations in the present levels of performance section of the IEP.
    3.Identify how a student's needs are linked to the general curriculum (e.g., a student's difficulty with visual processing may affect graphing skills required to achieve the math standards).
    4.Identify the goals that the student will be expected to achieve in one year and, when appropriate, short-term instructional objectives or benchmarks that are the intermediate steps to reach those annual goals). Standard-based goals do not mean that a student's goals and objectives in an IEP are a re-statement of a standard or a curriculum goal in a specific content area, but rather are a statement that reflects the necessary learning that will lead to attainment of the standard. For example, a student may have goals to acquire essential learning strategies (e.g., mnemonics, self-questioning, paraphrasing and summarizing) that will help him or her better meet the expectations around how to learn the content.
    5.Identify the special education services, including the adaptations, accommodations, or modifications to the general curriculum, and/or instructional environment and materials, as needed by the student to reach those standards.

    The IEP as the Cornerstone of the Special Education Process

    The IEP is a strategic planning document that should be far reaching in its impact. An IEP identifies a student's unique needs and how the school will strategically address those needs. IEPs identify how specially designed instruction will be provided in the context of supporting students in general education curriculum and in reaching the same learning standards as nondisabled students. IEPs guide how the special education resources of a school will be configured to meet the needs of the students with disabilities in that school. IEPs identify how students will be incrementally prepared for adult living. IEPs also provide an important accountability tool for school personnel, students and parents. By measuring students' progress toward goals and objectives, schools should use IEPs to determine if they have appropriately configured how they use their resources to reach the desired outcomes for students with disabilities.

    IEP at the center of six steps - support the student, prepare for adult living, identify resources, accountability, guide provision of services, and ensure coordinated approach

    Overview

    The Individualized Education Program (IEP)

    An IEP is a written statement for a student with a disability that is developed, reviewed and revised by a Committee on Special Education (CSE), Subcommittee on Special Education or Committee on Preschool Special Education (CPSE). The IEP is the tool that ensures a student with a disability has access to the general education curriculum and is provided the appropriate learning opportunities, accommodations, adaptations, specialized services and supports needed for the student to progress towards achieving the learning standards and to meet his or her unique needs related to the disability. Each student with a disability must have an IEP in effect by the beginning of each school year. Federal and State laws and regulations specify the information that must be documented in each student's IEP. In New York State (NYS), IEPs developed for the 2011-12 school year and thereafter, must be on a form prescribed by the Commissioner of Education.

    Who develops the IEP?

    An IEP must be initially developed and annually reviewed and, if appropriate, revised by the CSE, Subcommittee on Special Education or CPSE (hereinafter referred to as the Committee). The Committee is required to include certain individuals who know the student and his or her unique needs and who can commit the resources of the school to address the student's needs.

    To develop an appropriate IEP for the student, a group of individuals with knowledge and expertise about the student, curriculum and resources of the school must consider individual evaluation information and reach decisions in an effective and efficient manner. Information about the student's strengths, interests and unique needs gathered from parents, teachers, the student, related service providers, evaluations and observations are the foundation upon which to build a program that will result in effective instruction and student achievement. Each member of the multidisciplinary team that makes up the ...

    Solution Summary

    The IEP is the cornerstone of the special education process for each individual student. It is the tool to document how one student's special needs related to his/her disability will be met within the context of an educational environment. This guidance document provides important information for Committees on Preschool Special Education (CPSE) and Committees on Special Education (CSE)1 in developing IEPs that are reasonably calculated to result in educational benefit to a student.

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