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How Autism is Encompassed by IDEA

I need to make write a state dealing with autism and in this statement I need to articulate that autism is encompassed by IDEA. I know what autism is and all the symptoms but in my talking about this subjects evidently I am not getting this point over. I need some directions as to help me articulate this better to my readers.

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The Education for All Handicapped Children Act (P.L. 94-142) of 1975 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (P. L. 101-476) identified specific categories of disabilities under which children may be eligible for special education and related services. IDEA Partnership's will provide collaborative work on autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The IDEA Partnership is dedicated to improving outcomes for students and youth with disabilities by joining state agencies and stakeholders through shared work and learning. This dedication has been operationalized in the collaborative work on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) of 12 partner organization representatives, nine national and state technical assistance providers, and a number of state and local organizations and agencies. Members of this ASD collaborative work group represent a range of roles at all levels of the education system as well as coming from geographic locations from across the United States. Together with the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), these partners form a community with the potential to transform the way we work, and the way we provide services for children with autism.

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Here is more information for you:

During 1995-1996, 5,796,833 children in the United States ages 0-21 received special education and related services under IDEA, Part B and Part H.

http://www.asgc.org/ed-definition_of_disabilities.htm

What Disabilities Entitle A Child To Special Education?
The Education for All Handicapped Children Act (P.L. 94-142) of 1975 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (P. L. 101-476) identified specific categories of disabilities under which children may be eligible for special education and related services. As defined by IDEA, the term "child with a disability" means a child: with mental retardation, hearing impairments (including deafness), speech or language impairments, visual impairments (including blindness), serious emotional disturbance, orthopedic impairments, autism, traumatic brain injury, other health impairments, or specific learning disabilities; and
who, by reason thereof, needs special education and related services.

The most recent legislation, the IDEA Amendments of 1997 (P.L. 105-17), allows states and local education agencies to apply the term "developmental delay" for children ages 3-9. Previously, this definition applied to children ages 3-5.

For children ages 3 through 9, the term "child with a disability" may, at the discretion of the state and the local education agency, include children who are experiencing developmental delays in one or more of the following areas: physical development, cognitive development, communication development, social or emotional development, or adaptive development. . . .

Thus, children must meet two criteria in order to receive special education: (1) the child must have one or more of the disabilities listed below, and (2) he or she must require special education and related services. Not all children who have a disability require special education; many are able to and should attend school without any program modifications. Following are the disabilities included in the definition.

Autism: A developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and nonverbal communication and social interaction, generally evident before age 3, that adversely affects a child's educational performance. Other characteristics often associated with autism are engagement in repetitive activities and stereotyped movements, resistance to environmental change or change in daily routines, and unusual responses to sensory experiences. The term does not apply if a child's educational performance is adversely affected primarily because the child has a serious emotional disturbance as defined below. Autism was added as a separate category of disability in 1990 under P.L. 101-476. This was not a change in the law so much as it is a clarification. Students with autism were covered by the law previously, but now the law identifies them as a separate and distinct class entitled to the law's benefits.

Deafness: A hearing impairment so severe that the child cannot understand what is being said even with a hearing aid.

Deaf-blindness: A combination of hearing and visual impairments causing such severe communication, develop-mental, and educational problems that the child cannot be accommodated in either a program specifically for the deaf or a ...

Solution Summary

The Education for All Handicapped Children Act (P.L. 94-142) of 1975 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (P. L. 101-476) identified specific categories of disabilities under which children may be eligible for special education and related services. IDEA Partnership's will provide collaborative work on autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The IDEA Partnership is dedicated to improving outcomes for students and youth with disabilities by joining state agencies and stakeholders through shared work and learning. This dedication has been operationalized in the collaborative work on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) of 12 partner organization representatives, nine national and state technical assistance providers, and a number of state and local organizations and agencies. Members of this ASD collaborative work group represent a range of roles at all levels of the education system as well as coming from geographic locations from across the United States. Together with the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), these partners form a community with the potential to transform the way we work, and the way we provide services for children with autism.

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