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Prolog does not conform to a strict logic model

Decribe one way in which Prolog does not conform to a strict logic model.

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Decribe one way in which Prolog does not conform to a strict logic model.
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<br><br>Prolog inherently is a declarative language is not rigid in its declarative/procedural distinction. It's flexibility as a programming language permits it to incorporate some procedural features. For example, writing a declarative program is equivalent to defining a proof for a proposition (relationship). Prolog does not strictly meet this ideal because of the way it implements logical negation. Other declarative languages attempt to be more logical in a strict formal sense. Prolog on the other hand implements a subset of second-order logic (it deals with sets as well as atomic propositions) and the language's flexibility permits propositions which lie well outside the boundaries of any classification of formal logical systems. (The above is an extract, please rephrase it if you must.)
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<br><br>For Reference.
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<br><br>Overview of what logic programming and prolog is all about and why prolog does not conform to a strictly logic model:
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<br><br>There are many ways of organizing computations. Perhaps the most familiar paradigm is ...

Solution Summary

Ideas to prove that Prolog does not conform to a strict logic model are presented.

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