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    Mechanism of Wacker Oxidation

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    1. In the reaction of bromine and water to form a halohydrin the reaction goes through a bromonium ion, Why does water attack the more substituted carbon?

    2. In the Wacker oxidation, why does water attack the more substituted carbon of the alkene If the water had attacked the less substituted alkene to form an alehyde, how would you been able to tell the difference from your data?

    3. What are the net reactants and products in the catatytic cycle shown on problem 4 of attach file 3?

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    1) Why does water attack the more substituted carbon of a bromonium ion?
    The bromonium ion actually exists through several resonance structures:

    In organic chemistry, remember that more substituted carbocations are more stable. This resonance form is most stable:

    Because this resonance form has a carbocation, the ...

    Solution Summary

    This solution provides explanations of:

    1) Why water attacks the more substituted carbon of a bromonium ion.

    2) Why water attacks the more substituted carbon in the Wacker oxidation.

    3) How to find the net products and reactants in a catalytic cycle.

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