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    Molecular Interactions in Water

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    Please provide detailed explanations for the following questions regarding water molecules.

    What type of covalent bonds does the water molecule present (polar or non-polar bonds) and why?
    What type of intermolecular interactions occurs with these molecules?
    Why you think the boiling point of water is high?

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 10:19 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/chemistry/bonding/molecular-interactions-water-463979

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    What type of covalent bonds does the molecule present (polar or non-polar bonds) and why?

    The electronegativity values of oxygen and hydrogen are different. Hence, there is unequal pull of the shared electrons between the two atoms. Therefore, the covalent bond in water is polar. Since oxygen is more electronegative, it draws the electrons more towards itself. Consequently, the oxygen side of water molecule becomes partially negative, leaving the hydrogen side partially positive. Please refer to the illustration below (see attachment).

    What type of intermolecular interactions occurs with these molecules?

    The intermolecular forces of attraction (IMFAs) present in water are London dispersion force, ordinary dipole-dipole interactions and hydrogen bonds. Of these IMFAs, the hydrogen bond is the most significant. Water exhibits very extensive hydrogen bonding, resulting in some peculiar properties of water like a high boiling point, high surface tension, and high specific heat.

    Why you think the boiling point of water is high?

    The degree of hydrogen bonding in water is very extensive. One water molecule is capable of forming two hydrogen bonds with its neighbours. In order to boil water, these hydrogen bonds need to be broken to separate the water molecules. Consequently, a large amount of heat needs to be supplied in order to break these hydrogen bonds, resulting in a high boiling point for water.

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 10:19 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/chemistry/bonding/molecular-interactions-water-463979

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