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Corporate Sustainability: Examples of TQM

The high quality of the directors, officers and employees of Exxon Mobil Corporation is the Corporation's greatest strength. The resourcefulness, professionalism and dedication of those directors, officers and employees make the Corporation competitive in the short term and well positioned for ongoing success in the long term.

The Corporation's directors, officers, and employees are responsible for developing, approving and implementing plans and actions designed to achieve corporate objectives. The methods ExxonMobil employs to attain results are as important as the results themselves (ExxonMobil Corporation, 2010).

Exxon Mobil Corporation recognizes that customer satisfaction is of primary importance to its success. Mindful of its responsibility to the consumers it serves directly and the customers who resell its products, the Corporation strives to understand their requirements and concerns and to merit their business by responding effectively to their needs.
Specifically, the Corporation's policy is to:

? provide high-quality products that meet or exceed equipment specifications and consumer needs under all reasonable circumstances;

? furnish services that reliably meet responsible standards of performance, efficiency, and courtesy;

? furnish accurate and sufficient information about its products and services, including details of guarantees and warranties so that customers can make informed purchasing decisions;

? require truth in advertising and other communications.

In addition, where the Corporation's products reach the ultimate consumer through independent parties, such as service station dealers and distributors, the Corporation's policy is to actively encourage such parties to achieve standards comparable to those which have been established for the Corporation's own performance.

At its core, Total Quality Management (TQM) is a management approach to long-term success through customer satisfaction. In a TQM effort, all members of an organization participate in improving processes, products, services and the culture in which they work. The methods for implementing this approach come from the teachings of such quality leaders as Philip B. Crosby, W. Edwards Deming, Armand V. Feigenbaum, Kaoru Ishikawa and Joseph M. Juran. A core concept in implementing TQM is Deming's 14 points, a set of management practices to help companies increase their quality and productivity:

1. Create constancy of purpose for improving products and services.
2. Adopt the new philosophy (ASQ, 2010).
3. Cease dependence on inspection to achieve quality.
4. End the practice of awarding business on price alone; instead, minimize total cost by working with a single supplier.
5. Improve constantly and forever every process for planning, production and service.
6. Institute training on the job.
7. Adopt and institute leadership.
8. Drive out fear.
9. Break down barriers between staff areas.
10. Eliminate slogans, exhortations and targets for the workforce.
11. Eliminate numerical quotas for the workforce and numerical goals for management.
12. Remove barriers that rob people of pride of workmanship, and eliminate the annual rating or merit system (ASQ, 2010).
13. Institute a vigorous program of education and self-improvement for everyone.
14. Put everybody in the company to work accomplishing the transformation.

As standards surrounding corporate sustainability initiatives evolve, companies are beginning to weave sustainability capabilities more deeply into their organizational process and culture. These early adopters are poised to profit from corporate sustainability on more than one front-in a similar way that their forward-thinking predecessors succeeded during the quality revolution two decades ago. Given the ambiguity to the total quality management (TQM) movement is instructive. Companies that benefited dramatically from the quality revolution, such as; Exxon, treated quality as an opportunity for process improvement rather than as cost. Companies are beginning to embrace sustainability as an opportunity to gain competitive advantage (Fust and Walker, 2007) .

Solution Preview

The high quality of the directors, officers and employees of Exxon Mobil Corporation is the Corporation's greatest strength. The resourcefulness, professionalism and dedication of those directors, officers and employees make the Corporation competitive in the short term and well positioned for ongoing success in the long term.

The Corporation's directors, officers, and employees are responsible for developing, approving and implementing plans and actions designed to achieve corporate objectives. The methods ExxonMobil employs to attain results are as important as the results themselves (ExxonMobil Corporation, 2010).

Exxon Mobil Corporation recognizes that customer satisfaction is of primary importance to its success. Mindful of its responsibility to the consumers it serves directly and the customers who resell its products, the Corporation strives to understand their requirements and concerns and to merit their business by responding effectively to their needs.
Specifically, the Corporation's policy is to:

? provide high-quality products that meet or exceed equipment specifications and consumer needs under all reasonable circumstances;

? furnish services that reliably meet responsible standards of performance, efficiency, and courtesy;

? furnish accurate and sufficient ...

Solution Summary

The high quality of the directors, officers and employees of Exxon Mobil Corporation is the Corporation's greatest strength. The resourcefulness, professionalism and dedication of those directors, officers and employees make the Corporation competitive in the short term and well positioned for ongoing success in the long term.

The Corporation's directors, officers, and employees are responsible for developing, approving and implementing plans and actions designed to achieve corporate objectives. The methods ExxonMobil employs to attain results are as important as the results themselves (ExxonMobil Corporation, 2010).

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