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Information Technology in Civilian and Military Organizations

Discuss the planning for and implementation of information technology in civilian and military organizations based on the overall strategic goals require essentially similar organizational competencies.

The Case for this Module pursues the idea of the development of competencies through the use of information technology based on the overall strategy by examining the interesting convergence of civilian and military management. Two articles and a video from TED are of particular interest here. The first suggests that the military is becoming much more like a business, at least in terms of its information and financial management. Both perspectives have much to recommend them. It is also true that the strategic environment in each of the two sectors differs significantly, and that the basic competencies of the military should therefore differ from those required for achievement of civilian purposes. But, it can be argued, the environment within which information technology is employed is largely similar.

References:
http://www.ted.com/talks/thomas_barnett_draws_a_new_map_for_peace
http://www.naefrontiers.org/File.aspx?id=21911
http://domino.research.ibm.com/library/cyberdig.nsf/papers/2A4BBFF62659E48B852573A1007488DF/$File/rc24415.pdf

Solution Preview

It would appear that planning for and implementation of information technology in civilian and military organizations based upon the strategic goals, do require essentially similar organizational competencies. This is due to the fact that the planning for and implementation of information technology in both civilian and military organizations would require the organizational competency of being able to coordinate both intra-organizational and extra-organizational organizational activities, in respect to planning for the implementation of information technology. This is due to the fact that both organizations will be the competency of being able to have all of their differing departments and branches working in a coordinated manner in order to make the most feasible and practical plans for the implementation of information technology. This will require that both civilian and military organizations have proactive methodologies by which to have the leadership in the differing departments and branches to meet with one another in order to develop plans by which to be able to implement information technology into their organizational operational paradigms in a manner in which there will be no detrimental outcomes or effects for any of the departments or branches of the organizations involved. This competency of the coordination of ...

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