Share
Explore BrainMass

Organizational Communications

This solution defines culture. It also looks at how studying an organization's culture differs from studying a country's culture.

Solution Preview

1. Define culture

As you define culture, consider how it is focuses on organization. Notice how it is comprised of learned behaviors common to a group of people. The "learned" aspect is critical. Besides language, culture also embodies feelings, attitudes, and behaviors. It is also important to show how culture equips us with ways of adjusting or responding to situations both externally and internally. Culture also encompasses religion, manner of dress, and attitudes toward gender, animals, and other factors. Culture transcends race.

2. How does studying an organization's culture differ from studying a country's culture (or does it)? Please support you answer with examples from your experience.

Although this question largely differs from country to country and among organizations, I have formulated some ideas for your consideration. Many of these ideas are based on my own personal experiences.

If you want to argue that an organization's culture does not always depend on national culture, here are some ideas to infuse:

While living in Japan, I noticed that a country's culture definitely impacted organizational culture; however, the organization develops its own culture, which differed from the host nation. For instance, my company's culture was relaxed and informal. This attitude differed from the formal mindset of ...

Solution Summary

This solution defines culture. It also looks at how studying an organization's culture differs from studying a country's culture.

$2.19