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Larger corporations tend to develop a "corporate language"

Do larger corporations tend to develop a "corporate language" of their own? If so, is this a part of culture?

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There are two types of corporate speak: The benign lingo and the obnoxious, toxic, asinine, Orwellian, [insert your own expletives here] corporate language. Yes, yes, it is a language in itself, or a dialect at any rate, you learn it like babies learn their native tongues and become better at it as time goes by, and even then, you need higher corporate education (ay!) to understand what's being said half the times. And when you do have higher corporate education, like I do, sometimes you wish you didn't have to understand a word of it, much less speak it.

Corporate language is the only area in my whole corporate experience that I truly dislike. I have serious reservations about the concept of performance, I don't like some of the values that are disguisedly or not so disguisedly promoted, but corporate language is probably the only item in my long list of corporate "issues" that I would completely tear apart and then make illegal. Might as well be tearing apart the foundation of it all, because language is, basically, the foundation of it all. Language determines the way we think, the way we perceive ourselves, and the way others perceive us.


Personal image is also very important in the workplace (anywhere, really), but you can't get around with looks alone, you'll need to speak at some point in your employment (fancy that, eh?), and then the language you use will likely need to be coordinated with the rest of the image you project.

Think, "If you want to be a millionaire, dress like a millionaire," or think, "If you want to be a corporate player, talk like a corporate player". Image and speech, visual and audio, come together to produce a still of each individual that will place them in context to be recognized by the other players.

In the corporate universe, your speech complements your image, so if you "look like it" and "talk like it", it seems like you have half the job done already, right? Wrong. As pretty much with any false appearances, you can only fool the audience for so long. Because that's what corporate language is like, the epitome of false appearances, in a very ample meaning of the term.

You can use the formulas, you can use "the talk", but at any given day on your corporate highway, a patrol car will stop you and will ask for papers. In other words, ...

Solution Summary

Larger Corporations as they tend to develop a "corporate language" is determined.