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Peak performer, Reluctant contributor, Disillusioned Learner

Read each scenario, identify what coaching stage they are in and what action you would take. Answer each question as a Peak Performer, Reluctant Contributor, Disillusioned Learner, and Enthusiastic Beginner and explain your answer.

1. Gilbert Gnarley is a five-year sales veteran for your company. He is 38 years old. Prior to joining you company, Gilbert was employed by ABC Company for five years as a sales rep and by Williamson Company for seven years as an account rep. Gilbert is a career sales person who enjoys sales and really has no aspirations of moving into management. In your sales organization of six sales representatives, he ranks third in productivity. Typically, Gilbert's performance is at or just above quota.

Gilbert loves strategizing and reliving his sales conquests with you. He frequently drops by your office in late afternoons to share his adventures and to get advice on follow-up strategies or new presentations he's planning. He solicits your help on sales presentations frequently.

As you travel with him, you make some suggestions on new approaches but Gilbert says, "What I do works and I don't want to make any radical changes."

As Gilbert's manager, what is his development level and how would you handle this situation?

2. Joe Bodchock is 25 years old and joined your company in your management-training program following his graduation from college. Prior
to joining your sale team, he worked as a supervisor in the production department.

You just completed a field evaluation with him observing his sales skills. You were very disappointed in his results. Joe could not make a good company presentation, was disorganized and his day was poorly planned. Though his numbers are low, you have seen some improvement.

Towards the end of the day, he remarks, "Maybe I made a
mistake moving out of production. I'm not sure now I can handle this."

As Joe's' supervisor, what is his development level and how would you handle this situation?

3. Mary Poppins has been in sales for 15 years. The last 3 of those years have been spent with your sales organization. Mary has performed well, finishing 2nd each year and one of your leading sales rep on your sales organization.

Mary depends heavily on her relationships. You can't help but like her sincere, genuine approach to people enabling her to close many accounts previously considered "hardcore competition."

You recently sent Mary to the company's Advanced Sales Training class and after she returned, you questioned her about her plans to use the new material. She replied, "Well, I don't know, there are a couple of ideas that I might be able to use in my presentations. It was great meeting some of the other sales reps in the company and seeing our corporate offices". You're disappointed in Mary's attitude about the training but her results keep coming in. It's great having a steady performer like Mary on your team.

Several months later, you add a new sales rep to your organization and have to reshuffle territories. This reduces the number of existing leads available to Mary, forcing her to have to prospect and cold call more, which is not one of her strengths. Her sales skills are strained....mismatched for this new situation. Mary's sales results begin dropping.

As Mary's manager, what is Mary's development level and what would you do in this situation?

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1. Gilbert Gnarley is a five-year sales veteran for your company. He is 38 years old. Prior to joining you company, Gilbert was employed by ABC Company for five years as a sales rep and by Williamson Company for seven years as an account rep. Gilbert is a career sales person who enjoys sales and really has no aspirations of moving into management. In your sales organization of six sales representatives, he ranks third in productivity. Typically, Gilbert's performance is at or just above quota.

Gilbert loves strategizing and reliving his sales conquests with you. He frequently drops by your office in late afternoons to share his adventures and to get advice on follow-up strategies or new presentations he's planning. He solicits your help on sales presentations frequently.

As you travel with him, you make some suggestions on new approaches but Gilbert says, "What I do works and I don't want to make any radical changes."

As Gilbert's manager, what is his development level and how would you handle this situation?

Peak Performer- These employees have demonstrated commitment and competence in their job Responding to Their Needs: Though high performers are largely self-managed, they still need and respond positively to recognition. Yet they respond even more to high-level incentives such as getting involved in quality committees, training other employees, or further autonomy. Without these outlets and opportunities, peak performers can feel the company is taking advantage of them. Some peak performers are content to do their jobs ...

Solution Summary

FOr multiple scenarios, the expert identifies what coaching stage that are in and what action would be taken. The scenarios involve peak performer, reluctant contributor and disillusioned learner.

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