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Katrina: A tale of two leaders

Please read the following articles.
1. David D. Kirkpatrick and Scott Shane, "Ex-FEMA Chief Tells of Frustration and Chaos,"New York Times, September 15, 2005.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/15/national/nationalspecial/15brown.html?oref=login&_r=0

2. "A Military General's Leadership Lessons" (Q & A with General Russel Honoré, former commander of Joint Task Force—Katrina who oversaw the military relief efforts after Hurricanes Karina and Rita), Gallup Management Journal, January 8, 2009.

http://businessjournal.gallup.com/content/113629/military-generals-leadership-lessons.aspx

After reading the two articles, please answer the following questions:

1. In the Kirkpatrick and Shane article, several leaders are mentioned including President George W. Bush, Homeland Security Chief Michael Chertoff, and FEMA Director Michael D. Brown. Briefly evaluate each of these leaders on their overall effectiveness at Managing Execution and Driving for Results.
2. We learn from the Kirkpatrick and Shane article that FEMA Director Brown was removed from his job one week after the Katrina struck New Orleans. What portion of this outcome for Mr. Brown would you attribute to organizational factors versus Mr. Brown's personal ability to manage execution and drive for results?
3. Compare your analysis of Mr. Brown with an analysis of General Honoré's overall effectiveness in terms of execution and results. Which of the two is more effective? Why? What part of the General's performance do you attribute to organizational factors? How much of his performance do you think relates to his personal skills?
4. In the Q & A with General Honoré, the interviewer describes the General as someone who knows quite a lot about bossing people and who stresses that above all, the last thing a leader should do is "boss" people! The general is quoted as saying, "A leader's job is strategic: to set people on the right path and to do the planning and then to motivate the execution." How do you interpret the general's call to "motivate the execution" and his advice NOT to boss people? Are these two ideas consistent with the frameworks we have discussed in this competency?

Solution Preview

1. David D. Kirkpatrick and Scott Shane, "Ex-FEMA Chief Tells of Frustration and Chaos,"New York Times, September 15, 2005.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/15/national/nationalspecial/15brown.html?oref=login&_r=0

2. "A Military General's Leadership Lessons" (Q & A with General Russel Honoré, former com- mander of Joint Task Force—Katrina who oversaw the military relief efforts after Hurricanes Karina and Rita), Gallup Management Journal, January 8, 2009.
http://businessjournal.gallup.com/content/113629/military-generals-leadership-lessons.aspx

After reading the two articles, please answer the following questions:
1. None of the so-called leaders during Katrina led or managed any aspect of the execution process appropriately. President Bush didn't even fly over the destruction site until days later, those under his staff were inept, and he congratulated the person that was fired shortly thereafter, "Brown" on live television enraging those still suffering deplorable conditions. These leaders were inept and non-effective in their managing of the disaster, which ...

Solution Summary

This solution answers questions regarding FEMA and Joint Task Forces that aided after the Katrina disaster.

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