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Advertising prescription medications directly to consumers.

A soft drink company distributed cell phones to preadolescents in low-income areas. The phones routinely received advertising messages for the drink. Following criticism, the company said that the benefits of the disadvantaged children's having the cell phones (e.g., safety) outweighed any "exploitive targeting" considerations. Do you agree with the company's position? Explain your answer.

Is it right to advertise prescription medications directly to consumers? Why or why not?

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No, I don't agree with the company's position, and the company did itself no favors in the areas of corporate governance or favorable publicity, as they had hoped to do so. First of all, this is an age range of 10-12 years old. The company gave them free phones which routinely received advertising messages for a soft drink in a low-income area. Let's look at this; a soft drink, which is a good that is not even a necessity for adequate survival, and they're targeting poor and low income families, and their target market in this case are kids! It is safe to assume that the majority of the money, and therefore ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses the following marketing ethics scenario:

A soft drink company distributed cell phones to preadolescents in low-income areas. The phones routinely received advertising messages for the drink. Following criticism, the company said that the benefits of the disadvantaged children's having the cell phones (e.g., safety) outweighed any "exploitive targeting" considerations. Do you agree with the company's position? Explain your answer.

Is it right to advertise prescription medications directly to consumers? Why or why not?

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