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Union/Labor Collective Bargaining/Arbitration/Issues

1. State how production standards place managements and unions at odds against each other. Why do some unions prefer the right to strike in this matter while others prefer arbitration?

2. Explain how the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) in 1970 succeeded in alienating both unions and managements. What did the Reagan and George H. W. Bush administrations, and organized labor, do to combat these occupational hazard issues?

3. Describe the common grounds for discharge and the procedural requirements that are outlined in many collective bargaining agreements. State why the following are important when these cases go to arbitration: (1) the demand for high standards of proof; and (2) the need for rules to be clear and specifically communicated; (3) weighing extenuating or mitigating circumstances

4. Describe several of the jobs that have gone by the wayside due to automation changes. Continue with a list of five employer benefits to technological upgrades, five undesirable features of the problem for workers, and why they are affected.

Solution Preview

1. State how production standards place managements and unions at odds against each other. Why do some unions prefer the right to strike in this matter while others prefer arbitration?

Production standards place management and unions at odds against one another when workers or the labor union "feel that the effort level required to meet the standard is unreasonable" (Teamsters, 2013). A production standard may state that workers must pull so many boxes per hour or stamp so many pieces per minute. These standards are often set by management to ensure productivity of workers and avoid situations where workers are showing up but failing to adequately produce. Further, when workers are given an incentive (pay for action) production standards may be viewed unreasonable if workers feel they cannot make a reasonable amount of money in return for a reasonable amount of pay. Union workers feel that standards set are generally not scientifically based. Some unions prefer to strike to draw attention to what the union calls unfair labor practices (ULP). Employers are not allowed to replace workers who strike in regards to unfair labor practices (for instance, quotas set too high on production standards) and, should they employ temporary help to get by during the strike, the company must fire all temporary help once the issue is resolved. This is a right that unions are covered by the National Labor Relations Act.

Teamsters. (2013). Warehouse Production Standards. Retrieved from http://www.teamsterslocal67.com/index.cfm/about-us/stewards/grievance-checklist-warehouse-production-standards/

2. Explain how the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) in 1970 succeeded in alienating both unions and managements. What did the Reagan and George H. W. Bush ...

Solution Summary

The detailed solution discusses how production standards place managements and unions at odds against each other, and why right to strike or arbitration are chosen. It also explains how the OSHA Act alienated both unions and managements, and how Reagan and Bush's administrations combatted these issues. Also explains the common grounds for discharge and the procedural requirements that are outlined in many collective bargaining agreements, as well as important issues in arbitration. Finally, describes jobs that have been eliminated due to automation changes, and lists employer benefits to technological upgrades, five undesirable features of the problem for workers, and why they are affected. Includes APA references.

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