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Aviation Safety Program Management

Please assist with answers to the attached questions. No length requirement. Brief, concise answers are acceptable if they thoroughly address the questions.

1. Think of an aviation situation, perhaps involving FAR enforcement, where the result of the enforcement action was not to change the behavior, but merely to encourage pilots to not get caught in that behavior.

2. Some airlines provide pilots with an extremely accurate flight plans and predictions of fuel consumption. They offer the pilots a bonus or reward if they can complete the flight using less fuel that predicted. What level of motivation is this? From an aviation safety point of view, what are some of the predictable results of this type of program?

3. Getting airline passengers to pay attention to the safety briefing has become almost impossible. What motivates passengers to not pay attention? What could be done to change that?

4. A pilot is transitioning into a new aircraft. In the new aircraft, the electric trim button is in the same location as the transmit/interphone button in the old aircraft. What human factors problem can you reasonably expect to occur?

5. In a corporate aircraft, the two pilots normally alternate legs with one flying the plane and the other handling the radios and the paperwork. In doing this, though, they also swap seats. The pilot flying the aircraft always flies from the left seat. Do you see any potential human factors problems here?

6. How can a comprehensive safety program identify known human performance factors before they become accidents?

7. You receive a hazard report that is full of grammatical errors and misspellings. It looks like it was written in crayon. Nevertheless, it is a valid report. The individual signed his name. How are you going to handle this report?

8. You receive a hazard report forma pilot who says he has not been reimbursed for travel expenses in over three months. This is causing mental anguish and is becoming a hazard. How are you going to handle this?

9. Corporate HQ sends you an entire NTSB accident report (80 pages) and tells you to distribute this to all pilots as critical information. How are you going to do this?

1. You are the Director of Safety. One member of the aviation safety committee seldom attends meetings, but always sends a representative whose instructions are to "take notes
but say nothing. Make no commitments." What would you do about this?

10. You are the Director of Safety. You have conducted a formal aviation safety inspection of one of your divisions. The vice president of that division has rejected your report and refused to respond to it. What course of action do you take?

11. You are a corporate operator. A group of company executives regularly fly as passengers on your aircraft. You plan to provide them with in-depth passenger safety and emergency training.

What training methods could you use?
What subjects do you intend to cover?

12. Your company president wants to present a single monthly safety award to an individual and have the presentation publicized in the company newsletter. What criteria are you going to use to determine the monthly winner?

13. Consider the situation above. What type award are you going to recommend that the president give?

14. Excluding aircraft accidents, list as many possible uses for rate calculations in your organization as you can. List the different types or categories of exposure you might use.

15. If you analyzed an operation (or part of it) and an accident occurs, does that invalidate your analysis? Discuss the steps you would take to review your analytical methods.

16. When something happens in your company that involves aviation safety, you or your staff needs to know it happened in time to advise management on the proper response. Set up a system that ensures that your office is notified and the notification gets to you or someone that can respond to it.

17. Your company operates aircraft and carries passengers. You are going to develop a passenger safety program. List the topics you would cover in your program.

18. Some of the pilots in your organization have complained that some of their safety related aircraft write-ups were not properly corrected. How are you going to handle this situation?

19. Ground vehicles, when used around aircraft, are a common source of hazards on the flight line. How can the potential for accidents involving ground vehicles be reduced?

20. Imagine you as the Director of Safety for an airline observe the driver of a contract fuel truck driving at excessive speed on the flight line. How do you handle this situation?

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1. Think of an aviation situation, perhaps involving FAR enforcement, where the result of the enforcement action was not to change the behavior, but merely to encourage pilots to not get caught in that behavior.
The airmen that have been certified by Federal Aviation Administration develop a method how to dodge FAA inspectors and go on flights drunk. It is reported that several senior pilots have developed almost a fool proof method of avoiding being caught by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors.

2. Some airlines provide pilots with an extremely accurate flight plans and predictions of fuel consumption. They offer the pilots a bonus or reward if they can complete the flight using less fuel that predicted. What level of motivation is this? From an aviation safety point of view, what are some of the predictable results of this type of program?

Airlines that offer pilots bonus or reward if they can complete the flight using less fuel than predicted is a risk vs. Reward situation. If pilots routinely accept high-risk assignment as a normal job expectation it is hazardous. For instance, an air traffic control center may give some instruction to the pilot that might consumer more fuel; the pilot might decide to ignore such instructions just to meet the fuel limit. He might put the airplane at risk. This is a strong motivation to perform but potentially hazardous.

3. Getting airline passengers to pay attention to the safety briefing has become almost impossible. What motivates passengers to not pay attention? What could be done to change that?
Passengers have a false sense of security that motivates them to ignore the instructions. That apart the similarity of the manner in which the safety instructions are presented fails to engage them. They feel they know it all. The airlines can make the safety briefings more interesting by including a role play that should be engaging.

4. A pilot is transitioning into a new aircraft. In the new aircraft, the electric trim button is in the same location as the transmit/interphone button in the old aircraft. What human factors problem can you reasonably expect to occur?
The pilot is likely to press the electric trim button by mistake when he wants to use the interphone. The human/ machine changes, the pilot loses situational awareness and his potential for making error increases. In other words, the pilot may press the electric trim button when he wants to talk on the interphone.

5. In a corporate aircraft, the two pilots normally alternate legs with one flying the plane and the other handling the radios and the paperwork. In doing this, though, they also swap seats. The pilot flying the aircraft always flies from the left seat. Do you see any potential human factors problems here?
Yes, there are potential human problems that can happen. It is expected that the pilot that sits in the left seat uses his right hand to manipulate flying controls. However, if a pilot is left handed he needs to sit in the right seat to manipulate the flying controls. If he sits in the right seat then the other pilot will not be able to hand the radios and paperwork.

6. How can a comprehensive safety program identify known human performance factors before they become accidents?
A comprehensive safety program first explores all potential hazards and documents them. Then the safety program describes each hazard and suggests methods of ...

Solution Summary

This solution gives you the basics of aviation safety program management

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