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ADA and Discrimination

In actual practice, how well does the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) protect workers against discrimination?

Are there any examples from recent court decisions I could reference?

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1. In actual practice, how well does the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) protect workers against discrimination?

The ADA defines disability in three ways. For the law to consider you disabled, you need meet only one of these definitions:

1. You are disabled if you have a physical or mental impairment that greatly limits one or more major life activities.
2. You are disabled if you once had such impairment.
3. You are disabled if others regard you as having such impairment. The act also protects you if you associate with or have a relationship with someone who has a disability. (http://cgibin.rcn.com/johncm/cgi-bin/index.pl?Site=AmericansWithDisabilities)
Major life activities include seeing, hearing, speaking, walking, breathing, doing manual tasks, learning, caring for oneself, and working. (http://cgibin.rcn.com/johncm/cgi-bin/index.pl?Site=AmericansWithDisabilities).

ADA has worked in practice to protect some workers from discrimination if they meet the above tree criteria. However, there are many loop holes, ...

Solution Summary

In reference to actual practice, this solution examines how well the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) actually protects workers against discrimination. References and examples from recent court decisions are also provided.

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