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Business Problem Analysis Question

How do I add information to my Business Anaylsis Problem that I already have? I'm trying to add three sources or articles. Since this is an internal problem at my current work place where do I find the resources? Do I need to word it differently? I am trying to get these resources to combine a secondary Data Review. I am needing to use my Business anaysis problem that I already have as well as Compare the data collection techniques used in each of the three articles to the Survey I have created as well.

I have attached the business analysis first
secondary I have attached the business analysis w/ survey.

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How do I add information to my Business Anaylsis Problem that I already have? I'm trying to add three sources or articles. Since this is an internal problem at my current work place where do I find the resources? Do I need to word it differently? I am trying to get these resources to combine a secondary Data Review. I am needing to use my Business anaysis problem that I already have as well as Compare the data collection techniques used in each of the three articles to the Survey I have created as well.
Successful management of a shiftwork operation requires that a company pay special attention to the challenges of the shiftwork lifestyle and understand that both biological and social factors make it far more difficult for shiftworkers to perform their duties safely and effectively, relative to day workers.
As a company increases its use of night work and shiftwork, it must remain mindful of the increased risk of errors and accidents, lower productivity, and the increased "human cost" of employee attrition, absenteeism, and long-term physical and health challenges that are associated with shiftwork. It is therefore crucial that companies making this transition into "round-the-clock" operation mode put in place systems and programs to create an optimal working environment, work schedules that are both worker-friendly and meet operational needs, employee training programs to better prepare them for shiftwork, and methods for discovering shiftwork-related problems early, before they translate into operational crises or lost productivity..
In today's climate of downsizing, centralized operations, and increased automation, more responsibility is assigned to fewer individual employees. As a consequence, it is not uncommon to find a fatigued and sleepy employee working alone on night shifts, controlling critical operations or equipment. When all systems are operating smoothly, and the job is primarily one of passive monitoring, this may not be an issue. However, when problems arise or processes go awry, not only training and experience, but also the alertness and cognitive "fitness" of key employees becomes extremely critical.
Simply stated, a sleepy employee working in the middle of a night shift is much more likely to make errors and incorrect decisions. When rested and working during daytime hours, a well-trained and vigilant employee will routinely make proper decisions and, when necessary, take proper and timely corrective actions. But this same employee, when confronted with a similar problems scenarios at night, when they are struggling against sleepiness and their internal biological clock, may respond incorrectly or more slowly. An even more likely scenario is that the tired employee simply fails to notice an emerging problem. Thus, it is often not so much what the sleepy employee does wrong, but what he or she fails to do, which indicates the consequence of working during the 'low' phase of the circadian cycle. So-called errors of 'omission' (what a person fails to do) are even more effected by biologically driven sleepiness than errors of 'commission' (incorrect actions or steps a person actually takes).
As companies build more centralized control rooms, consolidating operations into one "nerve center," fewer employees now become responsible for monitoring more and more complex processes. This substantially increases the "net worth" of one employee's performance. We at SRI recognize that these employees do not perform like machines, constant over the 24-hour day. Rather, the human 'machine' is pre-programmed to have a 'down time' for maintenance and recovery. During this biological down time, which is called the 'circadian nadir' in scientific jargon, productivity, alertness, and mental performance falls over the course of a night shift, and reach lowest levels of the entire 24-hour day during the early morning hours, typically between 3 a.m. and 6 a.m. It is during this critical period that employees need a biological boost, and it is during this period when the Circadian Lighting System is particularly beneficial.
With fewer employees present on any given shift, there is less redundancy and the human margin of safety is reduced. In other words, there is a lower probability that at least one employee on duty will be alert to an emerging problem or able to think clearly through corrective steps. This is particularly true during the night shift, when staffing is typically lowest and when individual employees are at their biologically lowest point of alertness and mental performance.
Many companies are making large investments in capital improvements and install automated systems to transform their businesses or plants into state-of-the-art facilities. But only a few industry leaders have begun to invest in state-of-the art technology to improve the individual performance and safety for the irreplaceable human element in their operations. Shift schedules are often obsolete vestiges of the past, and little thought or investment is dedicated specifically toward helping each employee to achieve peak performance during hours that are known to be high-risk for errors and accidents.
The World That Never Sleeps
In this country, up to 23 million people work irregular shifts, with the majority of these at some time required to work through the night. Many industries already operate around-the-clock and even more are considering this option to increase production or to better utilize capital intensive equipment. It makes economic sense for capital intensive plants to operate continuously, even given the downside risks of night shift operations: decreased productivity, higher risk of accidents, and poorer product quality. Managers simply accept these consequences of shiftwork and maintain lower expectations and production quotas for night shifts.
The Gradual Evolution of Human Circadian Rhythms
For thousands of years, humans have awakened with the sun and slept at night. It has only been during the past century, with the advent of electricity and the electric light, that we have broken with this cycle that nature dictates. We appear to be destined to become a 24-hour society, and societal and economic pressures have imposed shiftwork on a large segment of society in a relatively short period of time. However, human physiology will change much more slowly. We can be fairly certain that this internal body clock will continue to instruct humans to be awake during the day and asleep during the night for many more thousands of years.
Scientists have discovered that this precisely-timed, 24-hour repeating process (or circadian rhythm) is actually controlled by a tiny area of the brain that in turn sends out signals to many control centers in the body. This internal brain pacemaker, or "biological clock" manages such functions as core body temperature, release of hormones into the blood, cognitive ability, as well as the wakefulness and sleepiness of an individual on a daily basis. We are awake and alert during daytime hours because our core body temperature is ...

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