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Recombination frequencies

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This question involves Drosophila. Order and give the map distance for these three loci involved in this question:

wingless (w) legless (l) buggy (b)
The phenotypes indicated above are recessive.
A cross between a wild-type female and a male that expresses all of the above
recessive phenotypes gives the following progeny:
1. 805 wingless legless buggy-
2. 813 wild type-
3. 112 wingless-
4. 114 legless buggy-
5. 125 wingless buggy-
6. 122 legless-
7. 3 wingless legless-
8. 3 buggy-
(a) What is the order of the genes on the chromosome
(b) Calculate the recombination frequencies of each region. Then draw a
chromosome map of the alleles, giving distances between each allele (use the first
letter of each word as the allele designation). What is the total distance?
(c) Identify which classes are parental (p), single crossover in region 1 (sco1), single
crossover in region 2 (sco2), and double-crossovers (dco).
(d) Is there interference here? Calculate the coefficient of coincidence and give the
interference.

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Solution Preview

Hi there,

Thanks for letting me work on your post. Here is my explanation:

(a,b) let us designate w, l and b as wingless, legless, buggy respectively.
recombination frequency for w-l: ...

Solution Summary

Recombination frequencies are examined.

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See Also This Related BrainMass Solution

How to Calculate Recombination Frequency

Calculate the recombination frequency between RC4-124 and RC-280 based on above numbers.

~12,000 F2 (304 orginal F2)
134 individuals with ss at one marker and ns at the other marker.were grown for phenotype.

Then the attached document, at the bottom of the first page column 2, there is some information that may help.

I don't understand how to set up the recombination frequency problem

Do I divide 134 by 12,000 and then times 100% ?

Please help me.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Pam

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