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How fish have evolved to survive in their environment

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Locate a diagram of an organism with the main organs and structures labeled.

help in explaining how the organism in the diagram has evolved physiologically to become suited to its environment

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https://brainmass.com/biology/fish-anatomy-and-physiology/fish-evolved-survive-environment-354395

Solution Preview

I have attached the photos. I have included a response that covers quite a bit of information to help you see how the fish has evolved to adapt to its environment. There are also links included to help you with any further information that you want to add.

Fish are aquatic organisms that have several features that allow them to survive in their environment. All fish have fins, which help them keep going in a specific direction by guiding them and providing thrust. Their bodies are streamlined to help reduce friction as they swim through the water. Their skeleton is important for this, too. The skeleton provides the framework for the outer structures and the muscles provide the power that allows the fins to thrust them through the water. The hindbrain is responsible for sending the signals for movement and keeping the fish balanced. The swim bladder is also important ...

Solution Summary

This solution contains detailed information about the physiological structures of fish that allow them to survive in their aquatic environment. It also describes the function of these structures. Two diagrams are included along with links, if further information is needed.

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