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"When Globalization Comes Home"

This has do do with the assembly for export plants in Mexico that are called Maquiladoras. And it refers to Stratification. As a basis it talks about how we virtually create slave labor for other countries so that we can have what we want at a cheaper price and still have quality. Also discussed is the fact that slave labor is not allowed here in the United States due to our labor laws and minimum wages laws. With this in mind can you please help me to answer the following. Include references Please.
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What role do you play, if any, in perpetuating global stratification? How do you contribute to the plight of the less fortunate in the world?
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What can or should be done to eliminate global stratification and the culture of poverty. Explain.
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Explain how the sociological perspectives would explain poverty. Be certain to use all three major sociological theoretical perspectives -- functionalism, conflict theory, and interactionism -- in your discussion.

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Interesting scenario! Let's look at each question, which you can then draw on for your final copy.

This has to do with the assembly for export plants in Mexico that are called Maquiladoras. And it refers to Stratification. As a basis it talks about how we virtually create slave labor for other countries so that we can have what we want at a cheaper price and still have quality. Also discussed is the fact that slave labor is not allowed here in the United States due to our labor laws and minimum wages laws

1. What role do you play, if any, in perpetuating global stratification? How do you contribute to the plight of the less fortunate in the world?

This question is asking you what role you play in perpetrating stratification. This is thought provoking.

Global stratification is the unequal distribution of the world's wealth and power, resulting in different levels of social classes. A social class is a category of people who have about the same amount of income, power, and prestige. The high-income countries are the relatively rich, industrialized nations. They include most of Western Europe, Canada, the United States, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand. The middle-income countries are characterized by per capita incomes between $2,500 and $10,000 per year. They have experienced some industrialization, but agriculture remains important in their economies. These countries include Chile (Latin America), Latvia (Europe), Malaysia (Asia), the former Soviet Union, the nations of Eastern Europe, Ecuador (Latin America), Morocco (Africa), and Indonesia (Asia). The low-income countries are primarily agrarian societies with little industry: most of the people are very poor and these countries are found in Central and Eastern Africa and in Asia. ...

Solution Summary

Considering Maquiladoras in Mexico, this solution responds to the questions on aspect of globalization and global stratification, pointing out how the theories (functionalism, conflict theory, and interactionism) apply to the discussion.

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