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Zero and Non-Zero Games

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Compare and contrast zero-sum game and non-zero-sum game and provide an example of each. With Carol Gilligan's work on moral development in mind, which gender do you think would prefer which situation? Explain your opinion

Include 3-4 references cited using APA format.

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https://brainmass.com/psychology/stages-of-moral-development/zero-nonzero-games-gilligan-theory-moral-development-594240

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The use of zero sum and non-zero are game terms used to refer to situations in which there are gains and losses. The term zero-sum refers to a definite competitive situation where the sum taken by one reduces what is available to another; whereas the non-zero term can be competitive or non-competitive in terms of gains or losses can be less than or more than zero. Spangler (2003) refers to a zero-sum game as the outcome of a dispute or negotiation such as measured amount of wealth that each party receives. For instance, a zero-sum situation indicates that a win for one party will be a definite loss for the other. He offers this example, if one party gets a 1000 more, the other party gets l000 less. Consequently, the wins and losses add up to zero. Further explained, by Spangler, "If there is a fixed amount of money.....if there is only one job, one person will get the job, and the other person will not—one win and one job loss equals zero".

Given theoretical ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses the concept of zero and non-zero games in the context of Gilligan's Theory of Moral Development.

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Prisoner's Dilemma Discussed

Go to: http://www.princeton.edu/~mdaniels/PD/PD.html

Answer the following questions:

1. What was the outcome of your game?
2. What strategies did you use?
3. Why were these strategies helpful?
4. Where did you go wrong and why?
5. What conclusions do you draw from this exercise?
6. What ethical theory does this exercise relate to and how?

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