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Cultural Differences in Self-Disclosure

Barnlund (1975) argues that people in some culture do not hesitate to open themselves by sharing their ideas and opinions in public; however, people in some other cultures prefer not to talk much about themselves in public. According to Barnlund, people who belong to the former case have a larger part of "public self" and a smaller part of "private self." On the other hand, people who belong to the latter case have a smaller part of "public self" and a larger part of "private self." Which category do you think you belong to?

If you are in a situation where you are talking with someone whose tendency of self-disclosure is different from yours, how do you feel? Discuss the challenges that can exist in regards to cultural differences and self-disclosure. Include a minimum of one scholarly source to support your views.

Reference

Barnlund, D. C. (1975). Public and private self in Japan and the U.S. Tokyo: Simul Press.

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Welcome kindly to BM! Please rate 5/5 for my 100 words of ideas and reference.

For me, the category I belong to is definitely the "public self." As a highly social and extroverted person, I feel highly comfortable sharing and divulging information publicly.

When I lived in Japan, I often shared personal and emotional details with Japanese friends who ...

Solution Summary

This solution briefly investigates a situation where one was talking with someone whose tendency of self-disclosure is different from yours. A brief example of 100 words is provided. One source is also linked to support the views.

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